Wisconsin judge denies request to re-arrest Kyle Rittenhouse


A Wisconson judge denied a request Thursday for Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse to re-arrest, despite complaints from prosecutors that the teen violated the terms of his release by moving out.

Judge Bruce Schroeder ordered the 18-year-old suspect to report his new excavations to the sheriff’s department, but said he did not lose his freedom when he packed up and moved out.

“To issue a court order now for a defendant who has appeared at every hearing would be breaking the law,” the judge said during a hearing broadcast live. “And I’m not going to.”

“After what this city has been through in the last six months, I don’t want any more trouble,” Schroeder said. “The police don’t want any more trouble.”

Rittenhouse faces murder and attempted murder charges for the Aug. 25 shooting deaths of two Black Lives Matter protesters and the wounding of a third.

The teen was with armed militia groups guarding businesses in Kenosha amid looting after the police shooting of Jacob Blake.

When confronted with protesters the night of the fatal incident, Rittenhouse shot and killed Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber, and wounded Gaige Grosskreutz in the encounter.

Rittenhouse is free with a $ 2 million bond, most of it raised by supporters.

But prosecutors wept badly when Rittenhouse moved from her home in Antioch, Illinois to what her lawyers described as a “safe house” because of the death threats.

“All it takes is a nutcase and he’s a problem,” defense attorney Mark Richards said. “There is a substantial link posted by supporters of Kyle Rittenhouse.”

The district attorney’s office wanted the bail increased by $ 200,000, and the teen re-arrested until he can get the extra money.

Huber’s father, John Huber, Grosskreutz, and lawyers for Huber and Rosenbaum participated in the court hearing broadcast live on Thursday.

Kyle Rittenhouse moved from his home in Antioch, Illinois to a "safe house" after receiving death threats, his lawyers claimed.
Kyle Rittenhouse moved from his home in Antioch, Illinois to a “safe house” after receiving death threats, his attorneys said.
Antioch Police Department / Chicago Tribune via AP

“This kid, we don’t know where he is,” Huber said. “You don’t know where he lives. No one in that court knows where he lives. “

Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger also argued that Rittenhouse has flaunted his freedom since he was released on bail, even showing up at a bar with his parents wearing a shirt that read “Free as shit” and signaling with the hands of white supremacists.

Binger said the teenager is now using a PO box that is neither in Illinois, where he lived, nor in Wisconsin, where the shooting occurred.

“We don’t know where an accused murderer is,” Binger said. “That is the bottom line.”

“I simply ask that this defendant be treated like any other person,” he said. “All defendants must provide this information.”

Kyle Rittenhouse (left) carries a gun while walking in Kenosha, Wisconsin, during a night of rioting after the Jacob Blake police shooting.
Kyle Rittenhouse (left) carries a gun while walking in Kenosha, Wisconsin, during a night of rioting after the Jacob Blake police shooting.
AP

Schroeder acknowledged that Rittenhouse violated the terms of the bail by failing to inform the court that he had moved, but said it was not enough to get him to be arrested again or to increase the amount of the bail.

“Most of the people who are out on bail, we don’t know where they are,” he said.

Meanwhile, Richards assured the court that his client would not miss a hearing.

“My client will show up,” he said. “He hopes to be able to litigate these crimes in the court of his honor. We have nothing to fear. The truth will set my client free. “

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