What would happen if winter lasted for years like "Game of Thrones"?



Winter is not reaching the northern hemisphere, and we have to thank the inclination of our planet.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The Earth's axis is slightly tilted as it rotates around the sun This means that the sun's rays do not hit our planet equally: if the rays hit the northern hemisphere directly, winter means the southern hemisphere and vice versa, because the Earth is called, because it orbits the sun It is true, the latitudes of the planet receive more or less sunlight during each season.

The[[5 real-life inspirations for the characters from & # 39; Game of Thrones & # 39;]"data-reactid =" 23 "> The Earth's axis is slightly tilted as it revolves around the Sun. This means that the sun's rays do not affect our planet equally: if the rays hit the northern hemisphere directly, they spell the winter for the southern hemisphere, and vice versa, because the Earth is titled, when the sun orbits, certain latitudes of the planet receive more or less sunlight during each season. [5 Real-Life Inspirations for ‘Game of Thrones’ Characters]

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "But what happens if the seasons – and specifically, the winter – Lasted for years on our planet as they do in "game of Thrones"?" data-reactid = "24"> But, what if the seasons, and specifically the winter, last for years on our planet as they do in "Game of Thrones"?

It depends on how it happened, said Christopher Walcek, principal investigator of the Center for Research in Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alabany. In other words, to answer the question, you must know what caused the winter to last for years.

It could happen (although I would not) if our planet fell in an orbit farther from the Sun (nop) or if it stopped orbiting completely in mid-February (this could happen … just kidding).

Let's say that the latter happened, and the northern hemisphere ended up forming permanently away from the sun.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "In that case, in the northern hemisphere, the days they would be short, the nights would be long, and you would have a high frequency of Snow storms. As the warmer weather would not roll to melt the snow, it would begin to accumulate, Walcek told Live Science. "Data-reactid =" 28 "> In that case, in the northern hemisphere, the days would be short, the nights would be long, and you would have a high frequency of snowstorms, because the warmer weather would not roll to melt the snow, it would begin to accumulate, Walcek told Live Science.

After just a couple of years, the prolonged winter weather would cause major changes in ecosystems, he said.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Trees of feeble leaves and plants that normally sprout in the spring would not; This would have ramifications for the rest of the food chain. "Bears and squirrels could not eat and would starve, deer would be slaughtered in a similar way," Walcek said. "Data-reactid =" 30 "> Deciduous trees and plants that normally sprout in the spring would not, this would have ramifications for the rest of the food chain." Bears and squirrels could not eat and would die of hungry, the deer would be slaughtered in a similar way, "Walcek said.

As the animals were adjusted to reduced sunlight and energy availability, "the populations of [every species] it would be reduced to a much lower level, "he said.

For example, many animals spend the winter months conserving their energy through various means as food becomes scarce.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Take frogs and turtles, survive the winter season by lowering your metabolic rate so they do not have to eat. These animals practically become "inactive of behavior" during this time, said Jon Costanzo, badistant professor of biology at the University of Miami. But "there are limits as to how long they can survive without feeding," he said. "Data-reactid =" 33 "> Take frogs and turtles, surviving the winter season by reducing their metabolic rate so they do not have to, these animals practically become" inactive from behavior "during this time, said Jon Costanzo, Assistant professor of biology at the University of Miami, but "there are limits to the time they can survive without feeding," he said.

If the winter continued, frogs and turtles would drain their energy reserves and, unable to feed themselves, they would die of hunger. Or, the metabolic waste that accumulates in the body during the winter accumulates and reaches toxic levels.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "" Frogs and turtles that live in cold seasonal places are very well adapted to survive the winter, even one especially long, "Costanzo told Live Science." However, it is doubtful that they could survive a hibernation That lasts several years. "" data-reactid = "35"> "Frogs and turtles that live in cold seasonal places are very well adapted to survive the winter, even a very long one," Costanzo told Live Science. "However, it is doubtful that they can survive a hibernation that lasts several years."

Winter in Westeros is long, but it usually ends after a couple of years. But, what if our world were stuck in the winter and the cold lasted for millennia?

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "That would look like a ice AgeSaid Walcek. But even ice ages have seasons, so let's imagine an ice age without seasons. "Data-reactid =" 37 "> That seems like an ice age, Walcek said, but even ice ages have seasons, so let's imagine an ice age without seasons.

Within hundreds of thousands of years, huge ice sheets and glaciers would form in mbadive parts of land and would be razed over villages and valleys, the researcher said. "If you stop [the Earth’s rotation] in mid-February, here in the northern hemisphere, you would probably see huge layers of ice over Europe and Canada in a thousand years. "

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "It is likely that places like the city of New York are in the edge of a ice sheet. There would be "enormous changes in the entire food chain of each animal and plant," Walcek said. People would spend more time hunting, leaving behind the hopes of growing plants under snow packets, he said. "Data-reactid =" 39 "> Places like the city of New York would probably be on the edge of an ice sheet," There would be "" Great changes in the food chain of all animals and plants, "said Walcek. People would take more in hunting, leaving behind the hopes of growing plants under snow packets, he said.

But physics will not allow this to happen, so … happy spring!

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Editor's note: This article was corrected on April 14 to clarify that Earth's tilt does not change as the sun rotates."data-reactid =" 41 ">Editor's note: This article was corrected on April 14 to clarify that Earth's tilt does not change as the sun rotates.

<p clbad = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Originally published in Living science."data-reactid =" 46 ">Originally published in Living science.


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