How to start a trial in Charlottesville Death of Intelligence, Community Community: NPR



A successful memorial to the street where Heather Heyer was killed when a car was introduced into a white rally in 2017.

Debbie Elliott / NPR


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Debbie Elliott / NPR

A successful memorial to the street where Heather Heyer was killed when a car was introduced into a white rally in 2017.

Debbie Elliott / NPR

A jury election begins today in a & # 39; a lawyer that the accused was moved to move his car through a public; Distinctive protest in Charlottesville, Va. James Alex Fields, Jr. is convicted by a first step murder in the death of Heather Heyer, and includes additional costs of serious injury.

Star Peterson was one of the wounded. When the rally was released on August 12, 2017 "Unite the Right" was eliminated by violence, Peterson was alongside a multi-determination group of midwives who marched. She did not see the Green Dodge Challenger coming from the back, accelerated down a hill on a narrow one-way street.

"I heard three blows," she remembers. "Two of them left the left tires over my leg."

Star Peterson was injured when a car was introduced to the public in August, 2017, in a white rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Debbie Elliott / NPR


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Debbie Elliott / NPR

Star Peterson was injured when a car was introduced to the public in August, 2017, in a white rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Debbie Elliott / NPR

Neon-pink funny pig and t-shirt with Black Lives Matter, Peterson is 38 years old now using a dog to walk. He has five surgeons and he could not return to work due to the badness she had been wounded.

"He broke the two legs, two parts of my spine, and one rib and then [I] It was also a great hit that had to be digged up, "she said.

Peterson intends to give evidence at the exam.

"I have to do something for Heather but just having a flower setting at her grave and if I can be part of a person who then killed her , without something I can do to remember, "said Peterson.

The authorities say Fields, a white 21-year-old white man who flows his car into a single-off show against racist and saying that he had been an earlier part in the rally with singers, promoting white cream.

Claims have been guilty. His courthouse, Denise Lunsford, refused to comment on his case.

Lunsford has asked the trial to be relocated outside Charlottesville, arguing the impact of the event on local residents and extensive advertising will impede Fields from obtaining fair and fair proofing.

Charlottesville Court Court Judge, Richard E. Moore, has taken a defense move to change a place where advice is. He says that a procurator can not find impartiality from a large 360 ​​human test group, he will review the case.

Key evidence from prosecutors including graphic videos will be shared on social media with witnesses.

"I'm feeling that a court is going to watch my daughter to die again, again and again," said Susan Bro, mother Heather Heyer.

She is ready to give the test, and he does not hope that a jury election will be a matter.

"I want them to be tested fairly and without discrimination," she said. "I do not want to have to do some time here now."

She says that she is feeling that the process could go for years if there are appeals. But whatever happens, she wants to see her case.

"Mr Fields has never been disturbed because I felt feeling in the hands of justice now," said Bro. "But I'm making a prayer that justice is here."

Its wider community also has a & # 39; looking for justice because he attempts to settle into the armies that Charlottesville's short-term defeated clash.

"Where we're going out here I do not know," said Don Gathers, co-founder of the local chapter of Black Lives Matter.

Don Gathers, a deacon at the Church of the first Baptist historian and co-founder of Charlottesville's chapter of Black Lives Matter.

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Don Gathers, a deacon at the Church of the first Baptist historian and co-founder of Charlottesville's chapter of Black Lives Matter.

Debbie Elliott / NPR

"We need to tell how Charlottesville will have more than just one hash tag, and more than just a blow on the racial history of this country," he said.

Collections have provided a number of citizen advisory panels – including the Ribbon Blue Commission and # 39; town on Race, Remembrance and Public Places.

He says it was awakened that this is the focus of a new civil rights war.

"We have reached a point now that we have to stop the race talks and begin to talk about the true elephant in the room that belongs to us."

Community Charlottesville's community foundation is a focus on tackling system racism. It is built over a million dollars for the Charlottesville Healing Fund.

"Part of what we were listening from our community needed to cure opportunities to work, opportunities for being honest and honest about our convention," said Head- sitting on the foundation, Brennan Gould. "And also to start working in ways that will help to address the effects of that history."

The foundation of funding is set up to increase staff growth, for example, and to improve security in the Jewish community. Gould says that the ongoing focus of helping many injured victims, including rents, resources, medical accounts and counseling.

"The world seemed to move forward," she says. "And still people still have to live hard and deal with the outcome of that disaster."

One way in which the property helps people who are in a position; Getting alive is a contribution to the social worker, Matthew Christensen, as a partner for Mental Health. It will be a saver, and help people to deal with things like going to; fill out disability applications or accessible housing search.

"It's a lot they need," says Christensen.

At present they need help to respond to their & # 39; and says he could be redesigned. But Christensen says that the test itself is an opportunity for accountability.

"For the person who is having a serious impact because this is a matter for people – the organizers such as Jason Kessler or Richard Spencer are not directly legally affected want to install this rally. "

Four rally partners have been convicted of violence, but crime has not been declared out of any crime. The organizers who deal with civil law, however, have been taken by residents of Charlottesville who attacked the Ku Klux Klan Act in 1871.

Survivor Star Peterson is supporting her certificate in a Fields test. But she thinks that justice is in justice.

"He can not be right," Peterson said. "We can not find out what was done. Heather can not be brought back."

If he may be convicted of Virginia costs, Fields could be sentenced to life in prison.

It is also marked on federal hate crime costs, which permit its & # 39; cause of death.


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