UK-made showbox-size satellites launched into space


Four-showbox-sized satellites have been successfully launched into space, to help monitor shipping movements from low-Earth orbit.

The satellites were built by Spire, a global data and analytics company all over Scotland, with the help of £ 6 million in government money.

Britain’s Space Agency confirmed MailOnline, successfully transporting them to space on the Soyuz launcher from the Plasetsk Cosmodrome in the UK at 12.25pm.

Nanosatlite has two on-board supercomputers with machine learning algorithms that can provide ‘highly-accurate prediction’ of boat locations.

The other two will be used to build inter-satellite links, the UK Space Agency told MailOnline.

Once in low-Earth orbit, they will be part of a constellation of more than 100 satellites, used to calculate boats’ arrival times at ports and to help businesses and authorities manage busy docks is.

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Disconnect Nanosat with supercomputers under construction. On-board supercomputer with machine learning algorithms that provide prediction of boat locations

“The satellites are shrinking in size and growing in ambition,” said Science Minister Amanda Sole.

‘A satellite may look like a gimmick the size of a showbox, but these nanosatellites are revolutionizing how we observe planet Earth – each having the power and intelligence of a regular satellite.

‘The government is ensuring that Britain remains at the forefront of this revolution and the Spire nanosatellites we support help us do so.’

The devices, ‘no bigger than a microwave’, are designed, manufactured, tested, integrated and assembled by employees of Spire Global at the firm’s headquarters in Glasgow.

Machine-learning enabled nanosatellites (pictured) were launched on a Russian Soyuz launcher, along with two more nano-satellites that would be used for inter-satellite links.  They are 'no bigger than microwaves'

Machine-learning enabled nanosatellites (pictured) were launched on a Russian Soyuz launcher, along with two more nano-satellites that would be used to use inter-satellite links. They are ‘no bigger than microwaves’

Spire received part of a £ 6m fund from the UK Space Agency to manufacture four nanoselanites, which would also support other companies such as Spire.

All four nanosatellites are part of the same constellation, the UK Space Agency confirmed.

The second two will essentially help tie the constellation together, but the overall constellation is intended to monitor shipping.

Which are two satellites On-board supercomputers will not be used to make strong connections between satellites in constellations.

The UK Space Agency said, “These connections allow satellites to act as relays, sending data to each other and to ground stations, which cuts down the time between data collection and its delivery.”

Together, they will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track the whereabouts of ships and predict global ocean traffic.

Nanosatlites, which received more than £ 6 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, will join more than 100 other space commodities supporting the maritime trade.  Picture is nanosatellites with supercomputers

Nanosatlites, which received more than £ 6 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, will join more than 100 other space commodities supporting the maritime trade. Picture is nanosatellites with supercomputers

Spire Global is a data and analytics company that identifies, tracks and predicts the world's resources and the speed of weather systems by 'listening' to the planet in real time and machine learning to know what will happen in the future.

Spire Global is a data and analytics company that identifies, tracks and predicts the world’s resources and the speed of weather systems by ‘listening’ to the planet in real time and machine learning to know what will happen in the future.

Despite the size of the ShowAbox and not weighing more than standard cabin baggage, nanosatellites have all the functionality of a conventional satellite.

UK Space Agency chief executive Graham Turncock said nanosatellites are very powerful in what they can do, Processing is a large part of power.

“The purpose of these four spire satellites is to make business with business ultra-precise, which makes the technology more cost-effective and efficient,” said Turnock.

The artist's impression of the spacecraft, which will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track ships' whereabouts and predict global ocean traffic

The artist’s impression of the spacecraft, which will join a fleet of more than 100 objects in low Earth orbit that work together to track ships’ whereabouts and predict global ocean traffic

Scotland’s space sector is booming. Our membership of ESA is benefiting companies across the UK, and we are committed to supporting the space economy in every sector. ‘

Spire Global UK is a satellite-driven data company providing predictive analysis of global shipping, aviation and weather forecasts.

Peter Plitzer, chief executive and co-founder of Spire Global, said his goal was to help companies and organizations predict ‘what’s next’ and make better decisions.

Platzer said, “This month we’re rolling it out by launching a super super-computer in Orbit – 1 to 2 Teraflops, so that we can properly analyze data in Orbit, using smart algorithms and machine learning. “

Spire Global UK is a satellite-driven data company that provides predictive analysis of global shipping, aviation and weather forecasts.

Spire Global UK is a satellite-driven data company that provides predictive analysis of global shipping, aviation and weather forecasts.

“With this we will be able to get better, smarter and faster analytics for our customers for their business decisions.”

The services have been developed under a European Space Agency (ESA) Pioneer Program, a partnership project co-funded by the UK Space Agency.

Elodie Via, Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications at ESA, said this is a prime example of the benefits of the Pioneer Program.

Artist impression of a UK spaceport.  The UK Space Agency selected the first vertical launch site in Sutherland on Scotland's north coast in 2018, which could be ready next year

Artist impression of a UK spaceport. The UK Space Agency selected the first vertical launch site in Sutherland on Scotland’s north coast in 2018, which could be ready next year

Meanwhile, the government is also supporting the development of space across the country, which will allow satellites to be launched from UK Earth for the first time in the coming years.

It is hoped that future nanosatellites can be launched from Sutherland on the northern coast of Scotland, with further plans planned for Cornwall, Glasgow Prestwick and Snowdonia, early next year.

Horizontal launch sites have prospects in the future UK spaceflight market, which may attract companies from around the world to invest in the UK.

BRITAIN will be the first to support over 10 lakhs per year at the age of 12

Sutherland has been chosen by the UK Space Agency on the northern coast of Scotland, as the location for Britain’s first spaceport.

The site is being developed by US aerospace and defense behemoth Lockheed Martin.

It will launch satellites and rockets into space in early 2021.

The port will boost Scotland’s already growing satellite industry.

Outside the US, Scotland produces more satellites than any country.

The UK is expected to launch an estimated 2,000 satellites by 2030.

The Sutherland project is under pressure from similar bids in Scandinavia.

The first Northern European site to offer a commercial launch is set to hold a stake in the billion-dollar global space industry.

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