The survivors of the Charlie Hebdo massacre were in tears as pictures of the attack are shown in a Paris court


On Monday, survivors of the Charlie Hebdo attack fled to a court in tears after CCTV footage of the horrific massacre was shown.

The court in Paris sat through graphic images showing scenes during and after the 2015 news room attack.

The trial of 14 suspects accused of aiding two gunmen who raided the offices of French satirical cartoons opened last week is scheduled to go on till November.

On Monday, survivors of the Charlie Hebdo attack fled to a court in tears after CCTV footage of the horrific massacre was shown. Picture: Two masked gunmen brandishing Kalashnikov and rocket launchers during the 2015 murders

The presiding judge of the court, Regis de Jorna, said, as he showed the footage on Monday: ‘Some scenes may disturb some people.’

Once the viewing began, some of the attack survivors left the room in tears, while some of the accused were seen in the box, while others fled.

Katie Richard, a civil party lawyer, said, “What we have seen is inhuman.” ‘They were killing machines.’

This court sketch, done last week at the Paris Courthouse, showed fourteen accused and their lawyers at the beginning of the trial of the criminals in the 2015 Charlie Hebdo jihadi murders

This court sketch, done last week at the Paris Courthouse, showed fourteen accused and their lawyers at the beginning of the trial of the criminals in the 2015 Charlie Hebdo jihadi murders

On Wednesday, January 7, 2015, at 11:33 am, when Cauchy’s brothers, Cheriff and Saeed, entered the premises of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, killing 10 people within two minutes.

A total of 12 people, including some of France’s most famous cartoonists, were gunned down at the scene.

Christian Du, the former head of the counter-terrorism unit of the Paris police, moved the court through the chilling events of the day.

The first of the graphic photographs taken by police just after his arrival, the webmaster Simon Fishee of the paper, showed the entrance used by the two brothers just before being shot, which was later evacuated, severely. Wounded from.

In the next room, Mustafa Hamara, a copy editor who worked at Charlie Hebdo for 30 years, lay in a pool of his blood.

A picture of the main conference room shows a maze of dead bodies, dead or dying among printers, and stacks of printing paper.

In all, 33 bullet cartridges were found at the crime scene, of which 21 were from Cheriff Kochi’s weapon alone.

Police found seven rounds in the body of Chief Editor Stephen Charbonnier, known as Charb, fired at a point-blank range of less than four inches, DU said.

Police and emergency vehicles killed 12 people at the scene after a gun blast at Charlie Hebdo’s offices in Paris in 2015

The trajectories of the bullets found in the bodies of most of the murdered cartoonists corresponded to execution-style murders from behind, Dade added.

Closed-circuit video recordings showed the killers calm and determined during the attack, and also during their stampede when they carelessly killed a police officer, Ahmed Merbet, who was already on the ground.

After a continuous exchange of fire with several police units, the two killers left their vehicle whose windows were shot to pieces.

The Koachi brothers, Cheriff (left) and Saeed (right), entered the campus of Charlie Hebdo in Paris and killed 10 people within two minutes

The Koachi brothers, Cheriff (left) and Saeed (right), entered the campus of Charlie Hebdo in Paris and killed 10 people within two minutes

The Koachi brothers, Cheriff (left) and Saeed (right), entered the campus of Charlie Hebdo in Paris and killed 10 people within two minutes

The police later found enough additional weapons in the car, leading them to believe that the brothers would be planning more attacks.

The police killed a wretched brother two days later.

Fourteen suspected accomplices are in trial in connection with the murders and a related attack on a Jewish supermarket.

The killings sparked a series of attacks on French soil, with ‘lone wolf’ attacks by people inspired by an Islamic State group that has claimed more than 250 lives.

The message of solidarity with Charlie Hebdo - the popular slogan 'Jae Suis Charlie' (meaning 'I am Charlie') - placed in Paris after the attack in 2015

The message of solidarity with Charlie Hebdo – the popular slogan ‘Jae Suis Charlie’ (meaning ‘I am Charlie’) – placed in Paris after the attack in 2015

The hearing began last week under heavy security as eleven suspects face court on charges of a terrorist act or conspiracy with a terrorist group.

Three others, including the wife of one of the gunmen, are being tried for absences as they fled to IS-occupied territory in Syria before the 2015 attacks.

The court is scheduled to hear the testimony of the survivors on Tuesday and Wednesday.

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