The Rohingya disaster in black and white

  • A Rohingya mother badfeeds a child while a boy sleeps beside her and men erect bamboo poles for a new home behind them.

    A Rohingya mom badfeeds a toddler whereas a boy sleeps beside her and males erect bamboo poles for a brand new residence behind them.

  • Rohingya refugees stretch out their arms in hope that they will receive a small bag of rice from a local humanitarian organization.

    Rohingya refugees stretch out their arms in hope that they’ll obtain a small bag of rice from a neighborhood humanitarian group.

  • Under the cover of darkness, desperate Rohingya (mostly women and children) cross the Naf River in boats into Bangladesh on the night of Sept 21. After their villages were destroyed in Buthiduang township, the Rohingya spent days walking to the Naf River.

    Under the quilt of darkness, determined Rohingya (principally ladies and youngsters) cross the Naf River in boats into Bangladesh on the night time of Sept 21. After their villages have been destroyed in Buthiduang township, the Rohingya spent days strolling to the Naf River.

  • A mbad of Rohingya waiting for an aid handout in Bangladesh following their exodus from Rakhine state.

    A mbad of Rohingya ready for an badist handout in Bangladesh following their exodus from Rakhine state.

  • A group of Rohingya travel for two hours in the back of a truck from Shah Puri Dwip to one of the camps in Balukhali. They fled their village in Maungdaw, Myanmar and crossed the Naf River into Bangladesh.

    A bunch of Rohingya journey for 2 hours behind a truck from Shah Puri Dwip to one of many camps in Balukhali. They fled their village in Maungdaw, Myanmar and crossed the Naf River into Bangladesh.

  • A young Rohingya girl carries water back to her family hut outside of Balukahli camp.

    A younger Rohingya lady carries water again to her household hut exterior of Balukahli camp.

  • Nur Alam, 65, lost his son Syed, 15, when the young boy stepped on a landmine planted in a field by the Myanmar military. Syed and three others were out for the day grazing their family's cows. "I carried my son's body back to our village," he says. Later, his village was destroyed.  He and the rest of his family arrived in Bangladesh on Sept 12.

    Nur Alam, 65, misplaced his son Syed, 15, when the younger boy stepped on a landmine planted in a subject by the Myanmar army. Syed and three others have been out for the day grazing their household’s cows. “I carried my son’s body back to our village,” he says. Later, his village was destroyed. He and the remainder of his household arrived in Bangladesh on Sept 12.

  • Lack of clean water, sanitation and medical  care in the refugee camps mixed with the monsoon rains, heat and humidity puts the Rohingya at risk of any number of diseases and sickness.  Dilara, 22, has arrived in Bangladesh on Sept 9. She has been suffering from a high fever for over 10 days.

    Lack of fresh water, sanitation and medical care within the refugee camps blended with the monsoon rains, warmth and humidity places the Rohingya susceptible to any variety of ailments and illness. Dilara, 22, has arrived in Bangladesh on Sept 9. She has been affected by a excessive fever for over 10 days.

  • After fleeing Myanmar by boat the prior night, a group of Rohingya women and their children take sanctuary at a local mosque in Shaw Puri Dwip. Most will stay only a night before traveling north to the mbadive refugee camps in Kutupalong and Balukhali. The women lived in Maungdaw township in the Rakhine state of western Myanmar.

    After fleeing Myanmar by boat the prior night time, a gaggle of Rohingya ladies and their kids take sanctuary at a neighborhood mosque in Shaw Puri Dwip. Most will keep solely an evening earlier than touring north to the huge refugee camps in Kutupalong and Balukhali. The ladies lived in Maungdaw township within the Rakhine state of western Myanmar.




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