The Queen should receive the Kovid Job to publicly persuade her to rely on vaccination when available.


The government adviser says the queen may promote coronovirus vaccines to convince people

  • Professor Heidi Larsen said 94-year-old queen should get Kovid vaccinated
  • He fears that people’s concerns about vaccine safety are not being resolved.
  • Vaccine misinformation expert said that Queen’s example builds public trust

A government advisor suggested that the queen may be called upon to help increase public confidence in the coronovirus vaccine.

Vaccine misinformation expert Professor Heidi Larsen said the 94-year-old queen should get a Kovid job to inspire public confidence in the vaccine

Vaccine misinformation expert Professor Heidi Larsen said she fears people’s concerns about vaccine safety are not being addressed, as a result of which they may not take it.

Scientists seem to have warned that unless the governments and technology firm Coronavirus deal with misinformation, the working Kovid-19 vaccine will not be sufficient to eradicate the ‘epidemic’.

In an interview with The Times, Professor Larsen, who led the Vaccine Confidence Project, said the castle would have to weigh the risks of using a new vaccine on the queen.

The government advisor believes this would be a ‘smart’ move as the queens can help build confidence in the vaccine in the older generation.

He said: ‘If there is one thing I have seen, and I (here in the UK) have been here for more than a decade, it is believed that he (the queen) gets it.

‘And he’s definitely in that old union, so I think that’s really, really smart.’

Prof. Larsen said that the ‘big question’ would be whether the queen, aged 94, would get the vaccine.

'Do you want to put a new comment on the queen?  ': The Queen is pictured outside a royal residence on Thursday wearing a blush pink coat and no mask after the epidemic at the time of public engagement.

‘Do you want a new commentary on the queen?’: The Queen is pictured wearing a blush pink coat and unmasked before the epidemic in her first public engagement outside a royal residence on Thursday.

‘I think the palace will have to decide itself – do you want to put a new comment on the queen?

‘Or do you want to keep him isolated? They said they want to weigh those risks.

Prof. Larsen said that while she would not like to place the queen in ‘one place’, the emperor was a ‘significant voice’.

He said that a communication strategy was important to respond to the ’emerging concerns’ around vaccines, rather than simply ‘brushing’ them.

I have been called in many discussions (with the government) on this.

“It is not clear to me that there is a coherent communication strategy,” Prof. Larsen said.

The government advisor said a communication strategy was important to respond to the 'emerging concerns' around vaccines, rather than 'brushing them'

The government advisor said a communication strategy was important to respond to the ’emerging concerns’ around vaccines, rather than ‘brushing them’

In a study of five countries, including Britain, scientists found a ‘clear link’ between Kovid-19 conspiracy theories and hesitation around future coronavirus vaccines.

While most of the people surveyed considered the misinformation to be unreliable, the researchers said they had caught some conspiracy theories in ‘significant parts of the population’.

Dr. Sander van der Linden, director of the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab and one of the study’s authors, said: ‘We find a clear link between believing coronovirus conspiracies and hesitation around any future vaccine .

‘Along with false claims, governments and technology companies must find ways to increase digital media literacy in the population.

The 38-year-old Duchess of Cambridge took a tour of the Institute of Reproductive and Development Biology at Imperial College London on Wednesday, where she heard about the work of national charity Tommy, gave her a lab coat and a blue floral face mask.

The 38-year-old Duchess of Cambridge on Wednesday took a tour of the Institute of Reproductive and Development Biology at Imperial College London, as it was given a blue floral face mask.

‘Otherwise, it may not be enough to develop a vaccine that works.’

A government spokesperson said: ‘The science is clear – vaccines save lives, which is why we are leading a global effort to find the Kovid-19 vaccine.

‘Inaccurate information in any form is completely unacceptable and it is the responsibility of everyone to seek the advice of the NHS, so that they have the right information to make the right choice.

‘Since the onset of the epidemic, specialist UK government units have been increasingly working to identify and rebut misinformation about coronoviruses, including working closely with social media companies.’

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