Home / U.S. / The president of the New Mexico House says he will not challenge the governor because of the National Guard's retreat

The president of the New Mexico House says he will not challenge the governor because of the National Guard's retreat



The Democratic president of the New Mexico House of Representatives says there is no way to start a process of impeachment against the state governor for withdrawing troops from the border with Mexico. An online petition seeks to indict Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham for treason by withdrawing around 100 soldiers from the New Mexico National Guard and has obtained more than 30,000 signatures.

On Tuesday, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Brian Egolf, of Santa Fe, said "in no way, forget it" regarding the prospects of impeachment proceedings. He has the authority to initiate investigations of the house.

Lujan Grisham has challenged President Trump's description of a security crisis on the border, while leaving a dozen national guards on the border to address humanitarian needs in a remote corridor for immigration that crosses the border. The change.org petition, initiated by John Daniel of Ruidoso, New Mexico, says that Lujan Grisham has "invalidated" Mr. Trump's authorization to deploy National Guard troops on the southern border and, in doing so, affirms that the Governor "deliberately and recklessly helped our enemies in illegal entry to the state, committing illegal activities and endangering the safety of their citizens."

The governor told CBS affiliate KRQE News 13 last week that he withdrew National Guard troops because there is no security crisis on the state's border.

"They could not say that having the presence of the national guard there has helped them significantly to deal with the infamous activities on the border, which is what they do," the governor said.

Nora Sackett, the governor's spokeswoman, told the AP that the "silly" request was a "false effort" by President Trump's supporters, mostly out of state.

The challenge in New Mexico requires a majority vote of all members of the House. A subsequent trial in the Senate requires a two-thirds majority to condemn.


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