The Premier League will be won, it will not be lost



Illustration for the article entitled The Premier League will be won, will not be lost
Photo: Michael Regan (Getty Images)

There was an extension of time on Sunday, as there have been a handful of moments during the last month, where it seemed that Manchester City would finally fall points. Burnley, in his home of Turf Moor, was a couple of points from the philosophy of "doubling but not breaking", experts in the dark arts of the shithousery. City looked frustrated, and although they faced little pressure on the defense, it seemed unlikely that a goal would come.

Inevitably, the goal came. When it did, it was by millimeters. After a flurry in the area, Sergio Agüero found the ball between his feet and managed to blow up the ball with enough power for defender Burnley Matthew Lowton could not arrive in time before he crossed the goal line for the mustache a dog. :

Less than three centimeters were located between the city and a tie that could lose the title:

The Premier League season is long: 38 grueling matches, interspersed by the best teams with the Champions League and two national cups. Therefore, City has not been on their free score, the dominant domain for a while now is not a surprise. Even when they give heart attacks to their fans and to Liverpool not to dominate, City is doing what it has to do: collect victories in what will probably be the second winning streak in Premier League history if they go to Raise their second consecutive trophy league.

Liverpool has been its own kind of incredible, as it seems a fundamental stretch of four draws from the end of January to the beginning of March. On Friday, the Pool Boys defeated the worst Huddersfield of the league 5-0 in Anfield, the team's sixth consecutive decisive victory in all competitions (and the tenth consecutive victory overall). The last time Liverpool was seriously challenged was on the last day of March, in a wild 2-1 victory over Tottenham, which was their biggest hurdle in the league (all for a lack of respect for Chelsea, who overturned in a comfortable 2-0 victory for Liverpool a couple of weeks ago).

The Reds have not lost points since the 0-0 draw against Everton on March 3, and throughout the season, their only defeat remains the best game of the season: a 2-1 defeat at Manchester City on Sunday. January 3. Like Sunday's game between City and Burnley, that game also featured a thin line of millimeters between a goal and no goal:

While some legitimate obstacles remain on the trails of both teams (Liverpool have traditionally been bad at St. James's Park, where they face Newcastle this weekend, and have to be the host of the Wolves' team on the last day of the season, the host of the city a formidable and confident Leicester City club on Monday, led by Brendan Rodgers, the former manager of Liverpool who was very close to winning the league with the Reds a few years ago), it is likely that both win, giving City the title and Liverpool a season of 97 points that will be the best ever for a team that did not win the title, and the third best overall.

Often, the narrations of the title race do not focus on excellence, but on prominent mishaps, in the style of Gerrard Slip. But that way of thinking contradicts the realities of football. Even if, say, Aymeric Laporte slipped in the final seconds of City's season finale against Brighton, leading to a draw that gives Liverpool the title, City will not have the "bottled" title. While there are real pressures on players now that they did not return in August, the points are worth the same every time they pick them up, and the City season will not be a failure because they only accumulated 96 points instead of 98.

Similarly, Liverpool's four draws in 2019 should not be presented as evidence in stupid debates about whether Liverpool "choked". The 2018-19 season of Liverpool has been almost perfect, and in any other season (the only exceptions are this season and the last), they would be walking towards the title. The moments are valuable, because they help us contextualize a broader narrative, but in the routine of football, they are only a handful of moments in a consistency marathon.

The points lost on the last day of the party cost the same as the points dropped on the first day, and thanks to the best title race that England has seen, those lost points have been less and farther than ever. The fact that the two best teams in England are reduced to the limit and with such absurd total points is a gift that there are no slips, goal line technology or a normal way that can take away all those who have invested during the last nine months. Whoever wins the title after all this will be the proud holder of one of the best achievements in the history of the European football club. Perhaps the most important thing is that whoever finishes in second place can hold his head high, knowing that he lost only by the best margins in a sport in which the line between success and failure, glory and dejection, can be decided by a few millimeters.


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