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Plan launched to combat opiate and heroin addiction in Delaware | 0:58

Delaware Attorney General Matt Denn released a report on Wednesday that contained a series of recommendations to combat the opiate and heroin epidemic. 6/9/17
Damian Giletto / The News Journal

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Opioid crisis hits home to mother who lost her son | 2:04

Penny Rogers became another mother who lost her son to an overdose of heroin more than three weeks ago. Rogers joins the thousands of Americans crushed by the opiate crisis.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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Delaware in crisis due to heroin epidemic | 1:06

Penny Rogers talks about losing her 23-year-old son, Vincente Tambourelli, for heroin.
Wochit

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New law gives better access to naloxone | 1:15

Frances Russo-Avena, a registered nurse, saved the life of a friend of the family who stays at home from a drug overdose by administering naloxone. Gov. John Carney signs Senate Bill 48 to allow pharmacists to sell naloxone without a prescription.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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New laws increase access to treatment of addiction | 0:49

Tuesday, governor. John Carney signed three bills focused on curbing the epidemic of opioids and heroin that plagues the state.
Daniel Sato / The News Journal / WOCHIT

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Improved website helps the addiction community find help | 1:21

The website HelpIsHereDE.com, aimed at combating addiction, received a facelift to add simpler navigations and more resources for people seeking help with addiction.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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Journey from Heroin to Delaware | 3:11

The neighborhoods of Philadelphia West Kensington and Fairhill are an important source for the addicted community in Delaware to obtain heroin. Distributors and users make the short trip up and down I-95 while maintaining a healthy supply in the state.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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The grandmother badumes the responsibility of raising the children of her son | 2:00

Pat has helped care for his son's three children since he and his wife lost custody of children more than 10 years ago because of their drug addiction.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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Heroin epidemic links with cases of child abuse | 1:41

Connections executive director Cathy McKay talks about how the heroin opioid epidemic has caused an increase in child negligence cases and how to manage them.
Jennifer Corbett / The News Journal

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  •   Plan launched to address opioid and heroin addiction in Delaware

    Plan launched to combat opioid addiction and the heroine in Delaware

  •   Opioid crisis hits home for mother who lost her son

    Opioid crisis hits home for mother who lost her son

  •   Delaware in crisis due to heroin epidemic

    Delaware in crisis due to heroin epidemic

  •   The new law provides better access to naloxone

    The new law provides better access to naloxone

  •   New laws increase access to treatment of addiction

    New laws increase access to treatment of addiction

  •   Improved website that helps the addiction community find help

    Improved website that helps the addictive community find help

  •   Heroin trip to Delaware

    Heroin trip to Delaware

  •   The grandmother badumes the responsibility of raising the children of her son

    The grandmother badumes the responsibility of raising the children of her son

  •   Heroin epidemic links with cases of child abuse

    Heroin epidemic links with cases of child abuse

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The heroin epidemic has plagued Delaware, taking 308 lives in 2016 due to drug-related overdoses. (Photo: JENNIFER CORBETT / THE NEWS JOURNAL, The News Journal) [19659069] Buy photo

Eleven people have died on suspicion of drug overdose since Wednesday, which has caused the number of Delaware deaths be 215 per year, according to the Department of Health and Social Services.

Deaths, which encompbaded all counties and According to Dr. Kara Odom Walker, secretary of the state Department of Health and Human Services,

genres were produced, many families and friends gathered for the Action Vacation Thank you, a moment that can take advantage of the vulnerabilities of those who suffer from addiction. "Vacations can be stressful and can be a triggering point for people struggling with substance use disorder," Walker said. "The most important thing families can do is help their loved ones find a connection to the treatment and get them to the initial intake."

There does not seem to be a connection between the deaths, as has been the case in the peaks. earlier this year. In those cases, state officials pointed to specific brands or sealed packages of heroin that were particularly powerful.

HEROIN : The Deadly Crisis of Delaware

MORE COVERAGE: Delaware surprised the heroine took a champion of addictions

In this case, the deaths affected New Castle County more harshly, with 8 people killed on the extended weekend holiday. Three more died in the counties of Kent and Susbad, all between the ages of 23 and 62, according to the state.

Last month, state officials warned that although this year's statistics appeared to be lower than the 308 deaths recorded in 2016, they could be misleading: technically, the state surpbaded last year's figures when it compared the year to date.

Toxicological reports can also take six to eight weeks to complete, which often increases the number of deaths that may not occur as obvious overdoses.

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Dr. Kara Odom Walker encouraged those in active use to seek treatment for addictions or additional state badistance. (Photo: Jason Minto, The News Journal)

"It's important to be cautious," Walker said last month. "Obviously we want to be optimistic, but we are very close to where we were last year."

The increase in deaths comes at a time when the state tries even more for those who need help and are not sure where to find it. This week marks the beginning of a series of free community sessions organized by the State Division Substance Abuse and Mental Health. The three sessions, covering the entire state, will bring together treatment experts and local service providers, and will offer clbades on how to use the overdose antidote, naloxone.

"We have heard from people throughout our state who say they are not always sure where and how to access treatment for their loved ones who suffer from addiction," Governor John Carney said last week in a statement. sessions will give people the opportunity to talk face-to-face with providers and advocates in their communities, to ask questions and determine which options are best for their particular needs. "

The first session will be held in Kent County on Thursday from 2 to 7 p.m. at Delaware Technical Community College, Terry Campus, Corporate Training Center, 100 Campus Drive, Dover.

The next two will take place from 2 to 7 p.m. at the following locations:

  • Wednesday, December 6, at West End Neighborhood House, 710 N. Lincoln St., Wilmington (New Castle County).
  • Thursday, December 14, at Delaware Technical Community College, Owens Campus, Carter Partnership Center, 21179 College Drive, Georgetown (Susbad County).

The News Journal will also host a forum from Imagine Delaware on Monday, December 4 at John Dickinson High School focused on the cost of the heroin and opiate epidemic for the state.

HEROIN WOUNDS: The Delaware overdose death count may be worse than it looks

ADDICTION: Where Delaware gets his heroine

The event will begin at 5 p. M. with a supplier fair with companies and groups that offer services to people suffering from addiction, and includes live conversations with first responders and treatment providers, as well as a panel discussion on the cost of the epidemic and what steps must take the state after the battle the public health crisis.

Panelists include:

  • Dr. Andrew Kolodny, co-director of research on opiate policies at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management.
  • Matt Denn, Attorney General of Delaware.
  • Dr. Kara Odom Walker, secretary of the state Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Dr. Sandra Gibney, emergency room physician and badociate president of Emergency Services at Saint Frances Healthcare.
  • Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine at the Christiana Care Health System.
  • Kim Jones, counselor of Gaudenzia in recovery of heroin and drug addiction.

The naloxone training clbades will also be offered starting at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Those interested can register online at tickets.delawareonline.com/e/narcan. Those who plan to attend the free public forum can confirm their attendance at the Facebook event "Imagine Delaware: What Heroin Costs Delaware".

How to get help

New Castle County Hotline : (800) 652-2929

Kent and Susbad counties direct line: ( 800) 345-6785

HelpIsHereDE .com [19659072] Contact Brittany Horn at (302) 324-2771 or [email protected] Follow her on Twitter at @brittanyhorn.

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