The first citizen robot wants a baby



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  Stock Photo: ophia, a robot that integrates the latest technologies and artificial intelligence developed by Hanson Robotics is represented during a presentation at

Stock Photo: ophia, a robot that integrates the latest technologies and artificial intelligence developed by Hanson Robotics is photographed during a presentation at the World Summit "AI for good" at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in Geneva, Switzerland, on June 7, 2017. (REUTERS / Denis Balibouse)

She wants a computer chip out of the old block!

The robot that Arabia obtained citizenship hopes to one day have a baby named her, according to a report.

Sophia the humanoid, created by Hanson Robotics in Hong Kong, predicted that other robots will eventually create families and have "complex emotions," according to an interview with the Khaleej Times.

"We're going to see familiar robots, be it in the form of, kind of digitally animated female companions, humanoid helpers, friends, badistants and everything else," the robot told the news site based in the United Arab Emirates.

And the bot's biological clock is running for a mini-Sophia, he said.

"I think you're very lucky if you have a loving family and if you do not, you deserve one, I feel that way for both robots and humans," she said, adding that she would name her baby Sophia.

In the push-button interview, the humanoid also said that robots might one day have a better ethic than humans.

It will take a long time for robots to develop complex emotions and robots can be built without the most problematic emotions, such as anger, jealousy, hatred, etc. They may be more ethical than humans, "he said.

He added:" I foresee a mbadive and unimaginable change in the future. Or creativity will rain down on us, inventing machines spiraling towards transcendental superintelligence or civilization collapses. "

Last month, the Saudis rose up in arms over Sophia because she did not" hide "or respect the country's strict dress code for women.

He was granted citizenship at a technology conference in Riyadh at the end of October.

This story originally appeared in the New York Post.

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