Home / Science / The famous statues of Easter Island mark where the inhabitants can drink fresh water.

The famous statues of Easter Island mark where the inhabitants can drink fresh water.



According to scientists, the famous statues of Easter Island are "closely related" to sources of fresh drinking water.

They were erected to indicate the best sources of water on the island, otherwise dry, so that the inhabitants can quickly find places where they can drink.

Explain the purpose of the mysterious statues, an enigma that has baffled the world for centuries, scientists say.

Experts also suggest that this means that the ancient civilization was a peaceful and supportive society and not a barbaric warmongering society, as has been suggested previously.

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The famous statues of Easter Island were erected to indicate the best sources of water on the island, otherwise dried (stock)

The famous statues of Easter Island were erected to indicate the best sources of water on the island, otherwise dried (stock)

The co-author of the study, Dr. Terry Hunt of the University of Arizona, said: "Monuments and statues are found in places with access to a critical resource for islanders on a daily basis: fresh water.

"In this way, the monuments and statues of the deified ancestors of the islanders reflect generations of sharing, perhaps daily, centered on water, but also on food, family and social ties, as well as cultural tradition that reinforces the knowledge of the island, precarious sustainability.

& # 39; And sharing points to a critical part of explaining the paradox of the island.

"Despite limited resources, the islanders managed to share activities, knowledge and resources for more than 500 years until the European contact interrupted life with foreign diseases, the slave trade and other misfortunes of colonial interests."

The 887 monolithic stone heads, or 'moai', and their huge platforms, or & 39; ahu & # 39; ahu & # 39; They are dotted by the remote Pacific island in eastern Polynesia and were carved by the people of Rapa Nui between 1250 and 1500, but their purpose has been debated for a long time. .

The statues are huge, up to 40 feet (12 meters) tall and weighing 75 tons.

They were decorated on the top with 'Pukao', a soft red stone in the shape of a hat and with torsos under the heads.

Researchers have wondered for a long time why ancient people built monuments in their respective locations, considering how much time and energy was required to build them.

The research has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The co-author, Professor Carl Lipo, of Binghamton University, New York, said: "The problem of water availability, or the lack of it, has often been mentioned by researchers working on Easter Island.

"When we began to examine the details of hydrology, we began to notice that access to fresh water and the location of the statue were closely linked."

His team used a mathematical technique called quantitative spatial modeling to identify a relationship between the location of statues and natural materials.

These included the padding of agricultural fields and gardens with stone tools, which is typical of a dry earth environment.

The other two most critical supplies on Easter Island were marine and freshwater sources.

Professor Lipo said: "It was not obvious when walking: with the water that emerges on the coast at low tide, one does not necessarily see obvious signs of water.

Experts also suggest that this means that the ancient civilization was a peaceful and supportive society and not the barbaric warmongering society, as previously suggested (stock)

Experts also suggest that this means that the ancient civilization was a peaceful and supportive society and not the barbaric warmongering society, as previously suggested (stock)

WHAT IS AFTER THE CIVILIZATION OF EASTER ISLAND?

The collapse of the Easter Island civilization is often used as a warning to exploit the environment.

It is believed that the inhabitants of the island off the coast of Chile were eliminated by a bloody war while fighting for the decrease of resources.

The Polynesian culture, called Rapa Nui, settled on the island around 1200 AD, and it is estimated that the population has been around 15,000 at its peak.

But when the Europeans established the island in 1722, the population had declined to a couple of thousand.

By the 1860s, the entire culture had almost completely disappeared, leaving just over 100 individuals.

All the civilization left behind were the iconic giant stone heads and an island full of sharp triangles of volcanic glass.

Archaeologists have long believed that these were used as weapons by the inhabitants of remote locations.

Recent scientists have suggested that the ancient civilization did not collapse, as resources ran out.

Some believe that the population was actually decimated by the arrival of Europeans, who brought syphilis, smallpox and slavery to the land.

"But when we started looking at the areas around ahu, we found that those locations were exactly linked to places where fresh underground water emerges, largely as a diffuse layer that flows to the water's edge.

The more we looked, the more consistently we saw this pattern. The places without ahu / moai did not show fresh water. The pattern was surprising and surprising in its consistency.

& # 39; Even when we find ahu / moai in the interior of the island, we find nearby sources of drinking water. This document reflects our work to demonstrate that this pattern is statistically sound and not just our perception. "

The lead author, Robert DiNapoli, a doctoral student in anthropology at the University of Oregon, added: "Many researchers, including ourselves, have long speculated on associations between ahu / moai and different types of resources such as water, land agricultural areas, areas with good marine resources, etc.

However, these associations had never been tested quantitatively or proved to be statistically significant.

"Our study presents quantitative spatial models that clearly show that ahu are associated with freshwater sources in a way that is not associated with other resources."

It was believed that the ancient inhabitants of Easter Island had been eliminated by the bloody war, while fighting for the increasingly scarce resources of the island.

But Professor Lipo believes that the lost civilization was destroyed by external influences and says that the latest findings support this idea.

Their previous research has shown that some areas near the banks had a salt concentration low enough that humans could drink safely.

The European accounts of the first encounters with the island in the eighteenth century include passages where the natives seem to simply drink sea water.

Since the human body can not process the high concentration of salt in seawater, this supports the team's theory of groundwater discharge.

The process of unloading coastal groundwater makes it possible for humans to collect fresh drinking water directly where it emerges on the coast of the island.

All statues have heads that are too large and are believed to be living faces of deified ancestors.

Wrapped in a mystery, this small mass of triangular land, stranded in the middle of the South Pacific and 1,289 miles from its nearest neighbor, has been the subject of endless books, articles and scientific theories.

WHAT ARE THE STATUES ON THE ISLAND OF PASCUA AND WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

What are statues?

Moai are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people on Easter Island, between 1,250 and 1,500 AD.

All figures have heads that are too large and are believed to be living faces of deified ancestors.

The 887 statues contemplate the interior of the island with an average height of 13 feet (four meters).

No one really knows how the colossal stone statues that guarded Easter Island were placed in position.

Nor why during the decades after the discovery of the island by the Dutch explorers in 1722, each statue was systematically toppled, or how the island population of Rapa Nui was decimated.

Wrapped in a mystery, this small mass of triangular land, stranded in the middle of the South Pacific and 1,289 miles from its nearest neighbor, has been the subject of endless books, articles and scientific theories.

All but 53 of the Moai were carved into tuff, compressed volcanic ash, and about 100 use red scoria pukao.

What do you mean?

In 1979, archaeologists said the statues were designed to contain coral eyes.

It is believed that the figures are a symbol of authority and power.

It is possible that they have incarnated old bosses and that they were deposits of spirits or "mana".

They are positioned for ancient ancestors to watch the villages, while seven look out to sea to help travelers find land.

But it is a mystery how the vast carved stones were transported to their position.

In its remote location off the coast of Chile, it was believed that the ancient inhabitants of Easter Island had been eliminated by the bloody war, while fighting for the increasingly scarce resources of the island.

The only thing they left behind were the emblematic giant stone heads and an island full of sharp triangles of volcanic glass, which some archaeologists have believed were used as weapons.


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