Tetraplegic Texas Man Struck With $ 3G Electric Bill After Winter Storm: ‘I Don’t Know How I’m Going To Pay This’


After a deadly winter storm left millions of Texans without power and facing shortages of food and clean water, some residents are now seeing exorbitant electricity bills.

Nicholas Milazzo, a quadriplegic, told “America Reports” on Monday that his need to keep the temperature high due to his condition has left him with an energy bill that he cannot pay.

“I have to keep my temperature high because I have trouble regulating my body temperature,” Milazzo explained to host Sandra Smith.

Milazzo said her electricity provider urged her to switch because wholesale prices soared during the storm, but not before they charged her $ 3,000 to heat her home.

SOME SKYROCKET TEXANS ELECTRICITY BILLS UP TO $ 17,000

“No vendor was allowing me to switch right away and I was basically left with a $ 3,000 bill that I don’t know how I’m going to pay right now.”

Griddy, a wholesale electricity provider in the state, addressed the price increases in a statement on its website last Thursday, writing “We know you are angry and so are we. P —–, actually.”

The company explained that wholesale prices soared because the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) took control of the Texas Electric Reliability Council, which operates the state’s power grid, on Monday and raised the wholesale price. at $ 9 per kilowatt-hour until the grid. could handle the demand caused by the winter storm.

TEMPERATURES WILL RISE IN THE SOUTH AFTER THE HISTORIC WEEK OF SNOW, COLD AND ICE

Milazzo said the experience has been “pretty tough” for him, as power and water outages across the state have left him without help.

“I have a nurse who comes in every day to help me and she lost water and ran out of energy, so I have been without help all week,” she said. “I am worried about the power going out, the water going out, so I had to fill my bathtub, fill my sink with water and pray that nothing bad happened.”

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Regardless, Milazzo is doing her best to stay optimistic, acknowledging that she is “one of the lucky ones that I still have power” and vowing to “be strong for everyone” as her condition begins a long recovery.

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

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