Stunning images reveal the moment when the moon BROUGHT Saturn



Cbadini was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in 1997, then spent seven years in transit followed by 13 years orbiting Saturn.

An artistic impression of the Cbadini spacecraft studying Saturn.

An artistic impression of the Cbadini spacecraft studying Saturn.

In 2000, he spent six months studying Jupiter before arriving in Saturn in 2004.

At that time, he discovered six more moons around Saturn, three-dimensional structures that rise above Saturn's rings and a giant storm that swept across the planet for almost a year.

On December 13, 2004 he made his first flyby of the moons of Saturn, Titan and Dione.

On December 24, he launched the Huygens probe, built by the European Space Agency, on Saturn's moon Titan to study its atmosphere and surface composition.

There he discovered mysterious lakes of hydrocarbons made of ethane and methane.

In 2008, Cbadini completed its primary mission of exploring the Saturn system and began its mission extension (the Cbadini Equinox Mission).

In 2010 he began his second mission (Cbadini Solstice Mission) that lasted until it exploded in Saturn's atmosphere.

In December 2011, Cbadini obtained the highest resolution images of Saturn's moon Enceladus.

In December of the following year, he tracked the transit of Venus to test the feasibility of observing planets outside our solar system.

In March 2013, Cbadini made the last flyby of Saturn's moon Rea and measured its internal structure and gravitational force.

Cbadini not only studied Saturn, but also captured incredible views of its many moons. In the image above, Saturn's moon Enceladus can be seen floating before the rings and the small moon Pandora. He was captured on November 1, 2009, with the entire scene illuminated by the Sun.

Cbadini not only studied Saturn, but also captured incredible views of its many moons. In the image above, Saturn's moon Enceladus can be seen floating before the rings and the small moon Pandora. He was captured on November 1, 2009, with the entire scene illuminated by the Sun.

In July of that year, Cbadini captured a Saturn with black light to examine the rings in great detail and also captured an image of Earth.

In April of this year, he completed his closest flyby of Titan and began his orbit of the Grand Final that ended on September 15.

"The mission has changed the way we think about where life could have developed beyond our Earth," said Andrew Coates, head of the Planetary Science Group at Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College London.

"In addition to Mars, the moons of the outer planets like Enceladus, Europa and even Titan are now the main contenders of life elsewhere," he added. "We have completely rewritten the textbooks about Saturn."


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