Storm knows more about the legendary ‘Sunken Kingdom’ of Francis Wells


Storm Francis has uncovered parts of an injured Welsh woodland that has been inundated for 4,500 years.

The Patriot tree, exposed at Lallanhistud on the west coast of Wales, belongs to the Cantre Gwelode Forest, the subject of a local legend from the legendary Sunken Kingdom of Wales.

Terrifying remains of the ancient forest have previously been seen 13 miles (21 km) north of Cardigan Bay, Borth’s beach.

Experts suggested that the pristine forest stretched for about three miles on the shore between Yenis-Las and Borath before being buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater.

However, new discoveries at Lallanhistud suggest that woodland may be much larger and wider than before.

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Ancient trees have been detected by storms on a beach – and are thought to be part of a 4,500-year-old sun forest. New underwater woodland was discovered miles from a bizarre forest that dates back thousands of years

Scientists believe that the useless trees are coming to the surface due to change in the weather.  Trees were exposed during the Storm Francis at Lellenhistud near Cardigan, Mid Wales - and the berth is 13 miles south of the forest

Scientists believe that the useless trees are coming to the surface due to change in the weather. Trees were exposed during the Storm Francis at Lellenhistud near Cardigan, Mid Wales – and the berth is 13 miles south of the forest

Pine, alder, oak, and birch trees are thought to have stopped growing from 4,500 and 6,000 years ago, as the world’s sea level rose and a thick blanket of peat formed, allowing the trees to thrive Kneel.

In 2014, shin-high stumps were visible for the first time on Borath’s beach, but locals said they were soon mostly covered with sand.

In May last year, Storm Hannah battered Wales and unearthed more of the stumps seen in living memory.

Now, courtesy of another storm, even many scorched forests have been exposed. Trials are now underway to determine the age of the forest.

Dr. from Aberystwyth University, who was part of a joint research project to look at coastal environmental change. Hywell Griffiths said the discovery was ‘exciting and worrying’.

He said: ‘This is exciting because it is additional evidence of these climate change processes that have been going on for so long.

‘But it is also worrying because we are seeing that these landscape changes happen more frequently. This is due to the impact and impact of hurricanes that feel that they are getting higher. ‘

Climate change and severe storms are making the forest more and more visible.  It is said that once a mythical creature neglected his duties, the submerged remains of a vast forest were drowned under the sea.  In fact, pine, alder, oak and birch trees began growing 4,500 and 6,000 years ago as the world's seawater grew.

Climate change and severe storms are making the forest more and more visible. It is said that once a mythical creature neglected his duties, the submerged remains of a vast forest were drowned under the sea. In fact, pine, alder, oak and birch trees began growing 4,500 and 6,000 years ago as the world’s seawater grew.

The forest has been linked to a 17th-century myth of a submerged civilization, known as the Cantere Guelode, or Century Hundred.

Legend has it that the ancient kingdom, called the ‘Atlantis of Wales’, once had fertile lands and townships extending 20 miles from the present coastline.

However, it relied on a dike to protect it from the sea. At low tide, the sluice gate was opened to allow water to drain from the land, and at high tide, the gates were closed.

It is said that when Merid, the priest of an angel well, neglected his duties, the Gwalal of the canter got lost in the flood and allowed the well to overflow.

Another version of the legend claims that Sithenin, the patron of the stronghold at sea, had lost the kingdom at sea when he forgot to close the gates.

In the more recent version, the watchman was assigned to take care of Gates, a heavy drink who caused the mistake.

Some say that on a quiet day, they can hear the bells of the submerged church of Canter’ed Gaelod.

Some trees regularly appear in Borath, Cerdigian, but are now seen 13 miles (21 km) south of Lallanhistad

Some trees regularly appear in Borath, Cerdigian, but are now seen 13 miles (21 km) south of Lallanhistad

The legendary settlement is believed to have been swallowed up by the sea and there is nothing left of what was once a great area spread along the Welsh coast and into the sea.  Artist's impression of state destruction, portrait

The legendary settlement is believed to have been swallowed up by the sea and nothing remains of what was once a great region stretching along the Welsh coast and into the sea. Artist’s impression of state destruction, portrait

During Storm Francis the trees were exposed at Lallanhistud near Cardigan, Mid Wales - and are 13 miles from the forest at Borath.  The new ancient trees depicted here are those discovered in Llanhistud, 13 miles from the ancient forest at Borath.

During Storm Francis the trees were exposed at Lallanhistud near Cardigan, Mid Wales – and are 13 miles from the forest at Borath. The new ancient trees depicted here are those discovered in Llanhistud, 13 miles from the ancient forest at Borath.

The area of ​​the mythological myth forest now under Welsh silt is still strong in the region. How many acres of ultra fertile land was worth, one acre of land was worth four times the normal land in many stories of the same time.

Commenting on the latest discovery, historian Gerald Morgan said: ‘This is an addition we have already discovered about the extraordinary number of extinct trees that have been found off the coast of Wales.

‘It’s exciting because we’ve got another one that hasn’t been recorded yet.’

The attraction of the mythical forest under Velas Gad is strong in the area.  One acre of land was worth four times the normal land in several stories of how valuable the ultra fertile land was.

The attraction of the mythical forest under Velas Gad is strong in the area. One acre of land was worth four times the normal land in several stories of how valuable the ultra fertile land was.

Historian Gerald Morgan says the new discovery suggests that an extraordinary number of extinct trees are already known that are found off the coast of Wales.  They said,

Historian Gerald Morgan says the new discovery suggests that an extraordinary number of extinct trees are already known that are found off the coast of Wales. “It’s exciting because we’ve got another one that hasn’t been recorded yet,” he said.

Myths of the ancient empire, dubbed Atlantis of Wales, include a legend that the Cantere Guelod, or Sunken Hundred, was once a fertile land and settlement 20 miles beyond the present coast, but lost under the waves was.

Myths of the ancient empire, dubbed Atlantis of Wales, include a legend that the Cantere Guelod, or Sunken Hundred, was once a fertile land and settlement 20 miles beyond the present coast, but lost under the waves was.

What was the cantileur galeod of vas?

Cantre’r Gwaelod means ‘The Laundered Hundred’ and is said to lie between Ramsey Island and Bardsey Island in an area known as Cardigan Bay in the west of Wales.

The cantre gélod is believed to have expanded about 32 kilometers (19 mi) west of the current coastline.

It was an extremely fertile land – so much that one acre of land there was worth four other places.

However, it relied on a dike to protect it from the sea. At low tide, sluice gates were opened to allow water to drain from the ground and at high tide, the gates were closed.

During the sixth century, the canter’ed gavelod was ruled by a famous king known as Guadadno Ganaheer.

Legend has it that when Merid, the priest of a water pool, allowed the water to overflow, the ground sank into the water.

In the more recent version, the watchman was assigned to take care of Gates which was a heavy drink.

He was at a party in the king’s palace one night when a storm came from the southwest.

The story is that due to too much alcohol he fell asleep and did not notice the coming storm, and failed to close the sluice gate, flooding the sea land.

The remains of prehistoric forests are sometimes exposed in Cardigan Bay during stormy weather.

In addition, fossil human and animal footprints, as well as some human instruments, have been discovered in recent years.

The dating of these objects suggests that they are thousands of years old, indicating that there was actually land in the area that is now the sea, although this was the case long before the reign of Gueddano Ganaheer.

Some say that on a quiet day, they can hear the bells of the submerged church of Canter’ed Gaelod.

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