SpaceX’s starship fires its raptor engine in SN8’s second static test


SpaceX is one step closer to launching its starship SN8 prototype 50,000 feet into the sky.

The firm, owned by Elon Musk, fired the rocket’s raptor engines for the second time during a static fire test at the company’s Texas facility.

The SN8’s engines ignited, releasing debris, orange smoke and flames from the base that lit up the night sky around 7:10 pm ET on Tuesday evening.

After the fire was extinguished, the audience could hear the roar of the raptor engine for the night before the rocket stopped.

This prototype is SpaceX’s first flight to take its first test flight with Noscon attached on top, suggesting that Musk could soon send a giant rocket into space.

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SpaceX is one step closer to launching its starship SN8 prototype 50,000 feet into the sky.  The firm, owned by Elon Musk, fired the rocket's raptor engine for the second time during the company's static fire test in Texas.

SpaceX is one step closer to launching its starship SN8 prototype 50,000 feet into the sky. The firm, owned by Elon Musk, fired the rocket’s raptor engine for the second time during the company’s static fire test in Texas.

Tuesday’s test marks eight successful static fire tests to date for Raptor engines, though this is the second attempt for the SN8.

The initial incident occurred on 9 November, but was investigated with the remaining minutes.

However, Tuesday was a success, as SpaceX was able to complete all tasks leading to steady fire.

One of the three Raptor engines was ignited first, followed by another two seconds.

The engines of the SN8 ignited, releasing debris, orange smoke and flames that lit up the night sky around 7:10 pm ET on Tuesday evening.  After the fire was extinguished, the audience could hear the roar of the raptor engine for the night before the rocket stopped.

The engines of the SN8 ignited, releasing debris, orange smoke and flames that lit up the night sky around 7:10 pm ET on Tuesday evening. After dying of fire, viewers could hear the roar of the raptor engines before the rocket went off for the night.

The SN8's (pictured) 50,000 feet hop was estimated to occur this week, as documents show SpaceX requested road closures in the area.  This will be the third starship to leave the launching pad - SN6 and SN5 are the only other rockets to achieve this feat

The SN8’s (pictured) 50,000-foot hop was estimated to occur this week, as documents show SpaceX requested road closures in the area. This will be the third starship to leave the launching pad – SN6 and SN5 are the only other rockets to achieve this feat

Video courtesy of SPadre.com

All of which created a huge field of smoke, which looked like a shark flying from the base.

Approximately five seconds after the incident, the engine cut off and the starship was standing – still intact.

Teslarati reports that the debris was likely solid erosion – nothing considered dangerous.

50,000 feet of SN8 were expected this week, as documents show SpaceX requested road closures in the area.

It will be the third starship to leave the launching pad – the SN6 and SN5 are the only other rockets to achieve this feat.

The large-scale craft is SpaceX’s planned next-generation fully reusable launch vehicle and the center of Musk’s ambitions to make human life travel affordable.

Musk had previously stated that the lifespan of each starship would be around 20 to 30 years, ‘like an aircraft’.

According to the billionaire, about three starship flights per day will launch from Earth per day or about 1,000 flights per day and each will have a capacity of over 90,000 pounds.

Constantly ferrying people over 180 million miles to Mars, Musk is predicting 1,000 human inhabitants by 2030 and by 2050 ‘about one million’.

The DuThe massive craft is SpaceX's planned next-generation fully reusable launch vehicle and the center of Musk's ambitions to make human space travel affordable.

The Du giant craft is SpaceX’s planned next-generation fully reusable launch vehicle and the center of Musk’s ambitions to make human space travel affordable.

Musk unveiled the first starship prototype in 2019 and expected the rocket to be in low orbit by March of this year and take people inside by the end of 2020.

However, the starship program has seen many bumps during its journey, which Musk has touched in the past.

“I expect we’ll do a lot of flights,” Musk said. ‘The former cannot work. This is a secluded area.

‘No one has ever built a fully reusable orbital rocket. So it is very important to be just that. ‘

While there have been many failures, Musk is now aiming for the rocket’s first orbital test flight in 2021.

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