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SpaceX will launch all 27 Falcon Heavy engines this week



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SpaceX shows the Falcon Heavy rocket on the launchpad.


SpaceX

The first demonstration launch of the world's largest new rocket could still take weeks, but first SpaceX plans to test fire Falcon Heavy & # 39; s 27 engines on launch pad 39-A at Kennedy's NASA Space Center on Tuesday.

SpaceX founder and CEO, Elon Musk, has said that Falcon Heavy, which is basically three Falcon 9 rockets tied together and joined to a single higher stage, will be the most powerful rocket since the Saturnian V beast that led to the Apollo astronauts to the moon. It will also include more than twice the blow of the next largest rocket system currently in use.

Heavy has been underway at KSC for several days, in preparation for the planned demo that lifts the Tesla Roadster Cherry Red from Musk out of Earth's gravity, and on a symbolic journey to Mars. That is, if it does not explode first, like Musk has warned that it could .

However, before launch, a series of tests must be completed. Perhaps the most dramatic is the static fire test in which Falcon Heavy is held in place and all 27 Merlin engines are fired. It's like putting a muscle car in neutral with the parking brake on and accelerating the engine to the red line.

SpaceX expected to perform a static fire test last week, but the date has been falling for unspecified reasons. The company's president, Gwynne Shotwell, said the recent and mysterious loss of a secret spacecraft that was launched aboard a Falcon 9 will not affect plans for Falcon Heavy.

Currently, fire flies from below Falcon Heavy on Tuesday, sometime after 1 pm PT. SpaceX will not broadcast live the test shot, but it will be possible to watch it through the Spaceflight Now subscription web camera.

We will also see you and let you know how the test is going or update this publication if the date falls again.

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