Singing Happy Birthday May Spread Kovid-19, A New Study Warns


How long to sing happy birthday can be good for washing your hands, but a new study suggests that it may also be a spread of coronovirus-infected drops.

Aerosol researchers from Lund University, Sweden studied the amount of particles emitted when we sing and this had an effect on the spread of Kovid-19.

To understand how many virus particles are emitted when we sing, the researchers had 12 healthy singers and two people with Kovid-19 sing in a funnel.

The study suggests that singing – especially loud and consonant-rich singing found in songs like Happy Birthday – spills a lot of drops into the surrounding air.

Researchers say that if singers wear face masks and practice venous social disturbances and apply good ventilation, the risk of singing can be reduced.

The NHS recommended people sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice during hand washing, as it was the right time to remove as many germs as possible.

To understand how many virus particles are emitted when we sing, researchers had 12 healthy singers and two people with Kovid-19 sing in a funnel

The researchers reported that the idea for the study came on the back of several reports about the spread of Kovid-19 in relation to singing together.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY makes ‘P’ and ‘B’ SOUNDS a risky case

Researchers say that songs with too many consonants are especially risky to sing because they push more drops.

Songs with high ratios of ‘B’ and ‘P’ indicate the greatest risk.

This includes ‘Happy Birthday’, a song recommended by the NHS to periodically scrub at the onset of the coronovirus crisis.

happy Birthday song:

YesPPy BFor you

YesPPy BFor you

YesPPy Birthday dear name

YesPPy BFor you

According to a study by Associate Professor of Aerosol Technology Jacob Londahl, ‘Different restrictions have been imposed throughout the world to make singing safer.’

Until now, there has been no scientific investigation of the amount of aerosol particles and large droplets that we actually sing when we sing, he said.

Aerosols are small airborne particles – some of these particles are larger than others and larger only move a short distance from the mouth.

Co-author Malin Alsewed, a doctoral student, said, “Some drops are so large that they only run a few decimeters through the mouth before falling, while others are small and can last for a few minutes.”

“In particular, the accumulation of consonants leaves very large drops and the letters B and P stand out as the largest aerosol spreaders”, added Alsved.

During research experiments, singers were required to wear clean air suits and enter a specially constructed chamber with filtered, particle-free air.

In the chamber, the number and mass of particles emitted by singers with breathing, talking, various types of singing and face masks were analyzed.

What he sang was a short and plosive-rich Swedish song, ‘Bibis Pippi Petter’, which was repeated 12 times in two minutes on a consecutive pitch.

According to the research team, the same song was also repeated, except for the vocals.

During song tests, aerosols and large droplets were measured using lamps, a high-speed camera, and an instrument that could measure very small particles.

The louder and more powerful the song, the greater the concentration of aerosols and drops, the researchers discovered.

‘We brought the measurement of the virus in the air closer to two people who sang when it was Kovid-19, which explained to Alsevd.

‘There was no detectable amount of virus in their air samples, but the viral load may vary between different parts of the airway and between different people.

According to the researcher, “According to, the aerosol of a person with Kovid-19 may still be at risk of infection.”

During research experiments, singers were required to wear clean air suits and enter a specially constructed chamber with filtered, particulate air

During research experiments, singers were required to wear clean air suits and enter a specially constructed chamber with filtered, particulate air

What he sang was a short and plosive-rich Swedish song, 'Bibis Pippi Petter', which was repeated 12 times in two minutes on a continuous pitch

What he sang was a short and plosive-rich Swedish song, ‘Bibis Puppy Petter’, which was repeated 12 times in two minutes on a continuous pitch

Researchers say that if we as a group of people have a good understanding of the risks involved while singing together, we can also sing safely.

The song can be sung with social disturbances, good hygiene and good ventilation, which reduces the concentration of aerosol particles in the air.

Facial masks can also make a difference in reducing the spread of droplets.

“When singers wore a simple face mask, most would capture aerosols and drops and the levels were comparable to normal speech,” says Löndahl.

‘Singing does not need to be silent, but it should be done with appropriate measures to reduce the risk of infection spreading at present.’

The findings have been published in the journal Aerosol Science and Technology.

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