Shark news: Scientists name ‘absolutely huge’ animal which is bigger than great white shark Science | news


There are over 400 recognized species of shark, of which the largest white is the most famous. Thanks to films like Jaws and 47 Meters Down, great whites have kept many people up at night – and for good reason. The Great White is one of the largest predators in the world and is responsible for more attacks on humans than any other species of shark.

According to the Florida Museum’s International Shark Attack File, great whites are top predators with very few natural enemies.

The museum said: “This species appears intelligent and inquisitive, and exhibits complex social behavior.”

But it may come as a surprise to learn that the great white sea is not the largest fish.

A study published this week in Frontiers in Marine Science gave the title to a very large animal staring at the oceans.

READ MORE: Shark success: stunning discovery may rewrite the creature’s origin

Adult great white females are known to grow up to 20 feet (6.1 m) in length and can weigh up to 5,000 pounds.

Typically, however, sharks measure between 15ft and 15ft (4.6m and 4.9m) on average.

Male great whites are typically 11ft to 13ft (3.4m and 4m) smaller on average.

But researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have found that female whale sharks outnumber great whites in the class of size.

In their newly published paper, researchers announced that female whale sharks can grow up to 59 feet (18 m) long.

They are often caught for their meat, oil and feathers, especially in parts of Asia.

The Florida Museum said: “Threats to this species include bycatch, fisheries, ship attacks and poorly operated tourism.”

And despite their large size, whale sharks are mostly moist and are filter feeders, meaning they swim lazy and dissolve in water to filter plankton, caviar and crustaceans.

Although generally not meant to pose a threat to humans, attacks are rare examples.

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