Post-vaccination COVID cases are not ‘surprising’


Post-vaccination “breakthrough” COVID-19 infections are being taken “seriously,” Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday as federal officials expressed concern about the increase in coronavirus cases in the US.

“With regard to the major cases of people who have been vaccinated and have finally contracted the infection, obviously this is something that we take seriously and follow closely,” said the country’s leading infectious disease expert during the virtual conference on White House coronavirus.

Fauci explained that some breakthrough infections in people fully vaccinated with any vaccination effort are not entirely uncommon.

“You will see breakthrough infections in any vaccine when you are vaccinating literally tens and tens and tens of millions of people, so in some respects that’s not surprising,” Fauci said.

Fauci said that “one of the important things that will be done, and must be done, is to sequence the genome of the virus that is the advancing virus” to find out if the infection was from the original strain of the virus or from one of the COVID. 19 variants.

“It would be very important to see if they broke through with the wild-type virus, which would indicate a real decrease in immunity or if they broke through with one of the variants, which would be much more explainable if you don’t have enough cross-reactivity,” He said.

A woman waiting to be vaccinated at the Vikings Training Center in Eagan, Minnesota, on March 5, 2021.
A woman waiting to be vaccinated at the Vikings Training Center in Eagan, Minnesota, on March 5, 2021.
Anthony Souffle / Star Tribune via AP

Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, added: “So all that information will be collected and it will be very informative for us on the type and frequency of advances that we will see.”

Fauci’s comments come after Minnesota reported 89 breakthrough infections this week among people who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus.

None of them were among the 6,798 COVID-19 deaths in Minnesota, including the nine deaths reported Wednesday, and doctors noted that even those who were hospitalized after being vaccinated had milder illness, the Star Tribune reported.

Idaho health officials also said this week that fewer than 100 cases of COVID-19 have been reported, according to KTVB.

Meanwhile, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, said during the briefing that the US has an average of 57,000 COVID-19 cases per day and that the average of seven days of cases has increased by 7 percent.

A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.
A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.
John Autey / Pioneer Press via AP, Pool

The most recent seven-day average of hospitalizations in the United States for the coronavirus was about 4,700, a “slight increase” from the previous seven-day period, Walensky said.

Additionally, the rate of COVID-19-related deaths in the country continues to “hover” around 1,000 a day, Walensky said.

“I remain deeply concerned about this trajectory,” she said. “We have seen cases and hospital admissions go from historic declines to stagnations and increases.”

“We know from previous waves that if we don’t get things under control now, there is a real potential for the epidemic curve to rise again,” Walensky said, urging Americans to “take this moment very seriously.”

For the past two weeks, the United States has been “consistently” vaccinating about 2.5 million Americans per day and the country is on track to meet President Biden’s new vaccination goal of 200 million injections administered in its first 100 days. in office, White House Coronavirus Response. Said coordinator Jeff Zients.

“With 200 million injections in the first 100 days, more than half of all adult Americans will have received at least one vaccine by April 29,” Zients said.

“No one even contemplated reaching this goal a few months ago,” he said. “But now it is possible thanks to the aggressive action we have taken.”

As of Friday, 71 percent of people 65 and older had received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine, according to Zients.

“That’s important because, sadly, older people account for 80 percent of COVID deaths,” he said.

People who had been vaccinated sit for a moment, waiting to make sure there are no allergic reactions at the Vikings Training Center on March 5, 2021.
People who had been vaccinated sit for a moment, waiting to make sure there are no allergic reactions at the Vikings Training Center on March 5, 2021.
Anthony Souffle / Star Tribune via A

Overall, Zients said, more than one in three adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine.

Since inoculation efforts began in mid-December, more than 47.4 million Americans or 14.3 percent of the population have been fully vaccinated.

“Clearly there are reasons for optimism, but there are no reasons for relaxation,” Zeints said. “This is not the time to let your guard down.”

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