Police give official warning to defiant Prince Philip after being caught driving without a seatbelt



Prince Philip received an official warning from the police yesterday after being caught driving without a seatbelt, only 48 hours after being pulled from the wreckage of a horrible car accident.

He imagined him breaking the law while driving his new car down a country road about a mile from the scene of the collision on Thursday, which left him in shock and bloodied.

Driving without a seatbelt can be punishable by a fine of up to £ 500, but police said the agents simply gave Duke, 97, a tick-off.

Prince Philip (pictured) was seen at the wheel of his new Land Rover on Saturday, just two days after he dumped his car in a shock of horror

Prince Philip (pictured) was seen at the wheel of his new Land Rover on Saturday, just two days after he dumped his car in a shock of horror

Prince Philip (pictured) was seen at the wheel of his new Land Rover on Saturday, just two days after he dumped his car in a shock of horror

The Duke of Edinburgh, 97, could be seen driving the car alone without a seatbelt at the main entrance to the Sandringham estate on Saturday afternoon

The Duke of Edinburgh, 97, could be seen driving the car alone without a seatbelt at the main entrance to the Sandringham estate on Saturday afternoon

The Duke of Edinburgh, 97, could be seen driving the car alone without a seatbelt at the main entrance to the Sandringham estate on Saturday afternoon

A spokesman for the Norfolk police said: "We are aware of the photograph, adequate advice has been given to the driver and this is in line with our standard response when he is informed or receives such images."

But last night, Duke's arrogant approach to safety was described as "reckless" and "crazy" by Princess Diana's former royal protection officer, Ken Wharfe.

Mr. Wharfe told The Mail on Sunday: "The senior officers in charge of your protection have serious questions to answer because someone needs to be able to deal with it and stop this now before another incident occurs."

It is unclear whether the police interviewed the Duke during Thursday's accident near the Queen's Sandringham Estate, which left him trapped in his overturned Land Rover. Two women who traveled in the other car with a nine-month-old child needed hospital treatment for minor injuries.

A driver claims that Prince Philip nearly crashed into her near the Sandringham property before his shocking crash on Thursday (pictured)

A driver claims that Prince Philip nearly crashed into her near the Sandringham property before his shocking crash on Thursday (pictured)

A driver claims that Prince Philip nearly crashed into her near the Sandringham property before his shocking crash on Thursday (pictured)

Depending on the outcome of a police investigation, the Duke may be required to surrender his license. However, after receiving a replacement from the green Land Rover Freelander racing just one day after the accident, he went ahead, determined to challenge those who asked him to stop driving.

Before returning to the steering wheel yesterday pbaded a test of police sight.

The extraordinary image of him who was not wearing a seatbelt was:

  • He imagined the queen wearing a safety belt while driving near Sandringham yesterday, a day after the eyebrows were raised when they saw her without one;
  • Police are investigating whether the video of the horrific accident filmed by high-tech cameras that fit Philip's car was investigating whether he should be prosecuted for negligent driving;
  • New dramatic details emerged of the consequences of the accident, including the way in which a witness "plucked the sunroof" to take the duke to safety.
The Queen was seen driving down a public street on Friday, less than 24 hours after the Prince Felipe accident, without wearing a seatbelt.

The Queen was seen driving down a public street on Friday, less than 24 hours after the Prince Felipe accident, without wearing a seatbelt.

The Queen was seen driving down a public street on Friday, less than 24 hours after the Prince Felipe accident, without wearing a seatbelt.

The queen wore a headscarf and a bright red lipstick and was accompanied by a companion as she left the Sandringham estate on Saturday.

The queen wore a headscarf and a bright red lipstick and was accompanied by a companion as she left the Sandringham estate on Saturday.

The queen wore a headscarf and a bright red lipstick and was accompanied by a companion as she left the Sandringham estate on Saturday.

Yesterday, the Duke was driving west on a one-way public road to the village of West Newton, just south of Sandringham, when he was seen without a seatbelt.

He was photographed in his new Land Rover while heading to the intersection of the narrow road and the B1440, where he turned right. After driving north on Highway B for a quarter of a mile, it veered off towards Sandringham Estate.

His accident on Thursday prompted calls from politicians to consider tougher checks for older drivers.

Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon said: "I know there is a self-certification of the fact that people over a certain age can drive, we may have to see something more robust."

Dickie Arbiter, the Queen's former press secretary, said last night: "Not wearing a safety belt at any time is not very sensible." Maybe he got injured and squeezed his muscles and putting on a belt could have been uncomfortable, I do not know.

"If I was not wearing a seat belt, then there has to be a good reason and if it was arrogance, then that is not good enough."

The route the Prince took while driving without a safety belt to Sandringham. And the box where the collision took place on Thursday.

The route the Prince took while driving without a safety belt to Sandringham. And the box where the collision took place on Thursday.

The route the Prince took while driving without a safety belt to Sandringham. And the box where the collision took place on Thursday.

Meanwhile, Mr. Wharfe added: "It is known that the Duke of Edinburgh is very difficult when it comes to personal protection officers, especially in Sandringham. I know he's stubborn, but this is ridiculous and it sounds like he's driving without a seatbelt on purpose to send a message. Your security team should be pulling your hair. "

Wharfe said the change in the Royals' protection system was partly responsible for the incident. Previously, the high-level Royals had their own personal protection unit, but now the officers have a rotation system.

He said: "In the past you would have officers with decades of experience who would know how to deal with the Duke, that's all gone."

The Norfolk police refused to divulge the details of the accident investigation, saying it was "in progress." But they confirmed that they had carried out a vision test that the Prince pbaded. It is understood that the Duke was asked to read a number plate 65 feet away.

It is believed that cameras installed in Royal cars for security reasons can record and transmit live images to personal protection officers. It is understood that the cameras in Philip's Land Rover were filming from various angles as the accident developed.

If the recording suggests that Philip was at fault and drove carelessly, then it could be used as evidence in a judicial process. The magistrates would have the power to fine you with 5,000 pounds, disqualify you from driving or put nine penalty points on your license.

The accident happened when Philip left a side road to the A149 road from the 60 mph limit. His Land Rover collided with a Kia car, sending his vehicle spinning across the road, where he ended up on his side.

The Kia driver, 28, suffered a knee injury and her 45-year-old pbadenger suffered a broken wrist. A nine-month-old boy tied to the back seat escaped from a serious injury.

Philip told the people at the scene that the accident happened after he was dazzled by the low sun.

Roy Warne, who helped after the accident, said: "We do not know if it was his fault." I've been telling people, "Do not rush to judge here, it could have been a mechanical failure, maybe the accelerator pedal is stuck."

He said about Prince Philip: "His legs were trapped, but he was incredibly calm." He showed no interest in his own situation, but was very interested to see that everyone else was fine. "

Buckingham Palace declined to comment last night on Philip's decision to drive again and his inability to wear a seatbelt.

I'm a fan, but this is crazy: the real biographer INGRID SEWARD urges Prince Philip to leave the street and lose some freedom

The Duke of Edinburgh is recognized as a free spirit, a man willing to challenge values ​​and force independence. He flew helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft until he could no longer dedicate himself to the hours, and sailed until the advancing years meant he could no longer compete.

However, the appearance of Prince Philip at the wheel of a Land Rover Freelander, without a seatbelt, after a miraculous escape from his shattered car surprised even his most fervent supporters.

It was only 48 hours, after all, since he was involved in that great terror strike near Sandringham.

The Prince's driving occurs less than 48 hours after he was left bloodied and shaken after his car took a somersault across the road & # 39; after hitting a Kia on the A149 in Babingley, Norfolk

The Prince's driving occurs less than 48 hours after he was left bloodied and shaken after his car took a somersault across the road & # 39; after hitting a Kia on the A149 in Babingley, Norfolk

The Prince's driving occurs less than 48 hours after he was left bloodied and shaken after his car took a somersault across the road & # 39; after hitting a Kia on the A149 in Babingley, Norfolk

Your car overturned. The 28-year-old woman who was driving the other car and a baby could have died. A pbadenger is now caring for a broken doll.

There seems to be little doubt that Prince Philip's leadership was to blame. He seemed ready to take the blame for the accident, apparently admitting on the scene that he had been a "fool" as he turned onto a main road with the sun in his eyes.

Now, he has been driving again, alone, on public roads and without a belt, an offense for which he received a tick from the police.

The appearance of Prince Philip at the wheel of a Land Rover Freelander without a seatbelt after a miraculous escape from his smashed car surprised even his most ardent supporters, writes Ingrid Seward (pictured)?

The appearance of Prince Philip at the wheel of a Land Rover Freelander without a seatbelt after a miraculous escape from his smashed car surprised even his most ardent supporters, writes Ingrid Seward (pictured)?

The appearance of Prince Philip at the wheel of a Land Rover Freelander, without a seatbelt, after a miraculous escape from his shattered car surprised even his most ardent supporters, writes Ingrid Seward (pictured)

Many will consider him lucky to have been treated with such indulgence.

So, although he is a considerate man who would have been deeply concerned about Thursday's fall, his decision to return to the road runs the risk of appearing imprudent, and a little insensitive.

Where were the security personnel who are supposed to be with him at all times? Where were the wise palace chiefs telling him how this would look to the public?

And why, most important of all, is he insists on continuing to drive on public roads when his reactions are obviously not as acute as they once were, and could hardly have been helped by the impact of the past few days?

The truth is that it is in its nature.

The duke would have been determined to get away from the accident once he had freed himself from the rubble. And I have no doubt that he would have been equally determined to return directly behind the wheel. He is not afraid of life and, given the way he is behaving, he seems not to be afraid of death.

He is unique, extraordinary, stubborn, determined, impatient and moody, and there will never be someone like him again.

The queen certainly does not want to lose it.

Motorsport experts said the police were likely to ask Philip (photographed at the wheel near Balmoral last year) to voluntarily surrender his driver's license because of his age

Motorsport experts said the police were likely to ask Philip (photographed at the wheel near Balmoral last year) to voluntarily surrender his driver's license because of his age

Motorsport experts said the police were likely to ask Philip (photographed at the wheel near Balmoral last year) to voluntarily surrender his driver's license because of his age

When she got sick during the Diamond Jubilee celebrations and then collapsed during lunch at Windsor Castle, she gave her very strict but humorous instructions: that she should not die for her, not that weekend, by any means!

She may well be rebuking him in the same way now.

Nor do we want to lose it, nor do we want to see innocent companions hurt or, worse, in their hands.

So, please, Your Royal Highness, at least leave the public road. Losing only a little of your freedom.

And then, in your own words: "Just keep going."

lgrid Seward is the editor-in-chief of Majesty magazine. His latest book is My husband and I: The 70-year internal history of The Royal Marriage, published by Simon & Schuster.


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