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PM to announce $ 60M to protect the Great Barrier Reef



A new $ 60 million model is expected to be released today to help protect the future of the Great Barrier Reef.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will announce the $ 60 million plan in Townsville today on an unofficial fighting tour in the marginally occupied seat of Herbert, The Courier reports reports.

Money spent to save the reef will be held for 18 months and includes $ 10 million for reinforced death squads, $ 5 million for water quality policing and more than $ 36 million to help farmers to reduce sediment runoff.

  An aerial hptogram of the Great Barrier Reef of April 2017 shows bleaching in large areas of water. (AAP)
An aerial hptogram of the Great Barrier Reef of April 2017 shows bleaching in large areas of water. (AAP)

$ 6 million was also earmarked for research and development to produce stronger and more resistant cross-linked coral from distant northern waters.

Mr. Turnbull will be received by leading scientists who are among the 64,000 professionals employed to care for the reef.

"This four-pronged approach will help secure the future of the reef and the thousands of jobs that depend on it," Turnbull told the newspaper.

  This shows that the Great Barrier Reef suffered massive whitening at Vlassoff Cay, near Cairns. (AAP)
This shows that the Great Barrier Reef undergoes massive whitening at Vlassoff Cay, near Cairns. (AAP)
  Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull today announced the $ 60 million plan in Townsville.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull today announced the $ 60 million plan in Townsville.

"The reef is a national treasure, and the pioneering research that can now be carried out will help ensure the future of the reef in the coming decades."

The principal investigator of the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences, Dr. Line Bay, The Courier Mail that the scientists were trying to develop a backup plan for the reef.

  Healthy coral in the Capricorn Island Group, in the Great Southern Barrier Reef, in 2016. (AAP)
Healthy coral in Capricorn Island Group, Southern Great Barrier Reef, in 2016. (AAP) [19659017] A dugong on the reef last year. (AAP) ” data-reactid=”98″/>
A dugong on the reef last year. (AAP)

"(This includes) the acceleration of natural evolutionary processes to improve certain traits that are important for health and survival (of the coral)," said Dr. Bay.

"These approaches range from the assisted gene flow and selective reproduction of stress-tolerant coral reserves to the active selection and manipulation of microbial symbionts with the aim of improving the stress tolerance of the coral animal."

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