Pets: Thousands of exotic reptile species are being sold online that are at risk of extinction


One study found that of the 3,943 reptile species, about four-quarters are sold as pets.

Experts in China and Thailand found that about 36 percent of all known reptile species are sold as pets – including many endangered and range-restricted species.

These include the Seychelles tiger chameleon and spotted Cape tortoise – both classified as endangered species.

The team compared online records of pet trades with data from two international wildlife trade databases over the past two decades.

They found that 79% of reptile species being sold are not subject to regulations under the Convention on International Trade in Threatened Species.

According to the researchers, the uncontrolled reptile trade may help push some species – those that live only in small areas in the wild – to the edge of extinction.

One study found that nearly four-quarters of the 3,943 reptile species sold to pets online have been weakened due to a lack of trade regulations.  Picture, a Toko Gecko

One study found that about four-five species of 3,943 reptile species sold as pets have been made vulnerable due to lack of trade regulations. Picture, a Toko Gecko

Experts in China and Thailand found that about 36 percent of all known reptile species are sold as pets - including many endangered and range-restricted species.  These include the endangered Seychelles tiger chameleon and spotted Cape tortoise, pictured

Experts in China and Thailand found that about 36 percent of all known reptile species are sold as pets – including many endangered and range-restricted species. These include the endangered Seychelles tiger chameleon and spotted Cape tortoise, pictured

Alice Hughes, paper writer and conservation scientist at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, said, ‘Reptiles have become popular pets.

‘They fit well with the modern lifestyle, especially in urban areas. He said that low maintenance, little space is required and it is easy to keep even when there is a busy schedule.

‘They have always been considered quiet – and now they are very easily accessible. We can expect it to continue to develop in the future. ‘

‘It is important to ensure that it is sustainable, as many pets were collected from the trade – including more than 70 percent of lizards.’

‘We have noted a steady increase in the number of species in the trade, so we can expect their popularity to continue to increase.’

In their study, Dr. Hughes and colleagues foisted the web to gather information about the online trade of reptiles from the years 2000–2019.

This was then compared with data from two wildlife trade databases of threatened species on international trade and the Convention in the US Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement Management Information System.

Dr. “Based on information from two international trade databases and information from 24,000 web pages in five languages, we found that 36 percent of reptile species are in trade – about 4,000 species in total,” Hughes said.

In addition, 79 percent of these species are not currently subject to regulations on the Convention on International Trade in Threatened Species.

The team also found that 90 percent of the reptile species trade – equal to half of the total number of individuals – was removed from the wild, rather than kept in captivity as usual in the pet cat and dog trade.

The team found that 79 percent of reptile species being sold are not subject to regulations subject to the Convention on International Trade in Threatened Species.  The picture, a Seychelles tiger chameleon, an endangered species sold in the online pet market

The team found that 79 percent of reptile species being sold are not subject to regulations subject to the Convention on International Trade in Threatened Species. Picture, a Seychelles tiger chameleon, an endangered species sold in the online pet market

Researchers said that the species being traded are the genus Cirtodactylus and the blue-headed Indo-Chinese forest lizard, Callotes mystaceus, Fig.

Researchers said that the species being traded are the genus Cirtodactylus and the blue-headed Indo-Chinese forest lizard, Callotes mystaceus, Fig.

Dr. Hughes said, “If we fail to mitigate the effects of unorganized trade, small-range and endemic species may suffer an ongoing biodiversity crisis.”

Researchers found that Vietnam was a major source of some of the more threatened species being traded – while the largest consumer markets were found in Europe and North America.

The species being traded include the genus Cirtodactylus and the blue-headed Indo-Chinese forest lizard, Callots mystaceus.

Dr. Hughes reported, “Sciertodactylus is primarily threatened by trade, as most of the species in the group have not yet been described and many are restricted to a single limestone hill.”

‘This species does not currently have an international association for nature conservation, but many are for sale online within a year of their scientific description.’

‘Orange colored Tokay Gekko from Indonesia -‘ Gekko Gekko ‘. Many of those individuals come from the wild because they are sold locally for under $ 1. ‘

Dr. Hughes and co-workers are calling for a change in the burden of proof – such that future business must prove sustainable before moving forward.

According to the latest annual study by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association, 0.55 million lizards, snakes, turtles and turtles were kept as pets in the UK in 2020, compared to an estimated 9 million dogs and 7.5 million cats.  A 2017 study, however, warned that three-quarters of exotic reptiles are sold as pets that die within a year - people don't know how to care for them.

According to the latest annual study by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association, 0.55 million lizards, snakes, turtles and turtles were kept as pets in the UK in 2020, compared to an estimated 9 million dogs and 7.5 million cats. A 2017 study, however, warned that three-quarters of exotic reptiles are sold as pets that die within a year – people don’t know how to care for them.

According to the latest annual study by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association, 0.55 million lizards, snakes, turtles and turtles were kept as pets in the UK in 2020, compared to an estimated 9 million dogs and 7.5 million cats.

A 2017 study, however, warned that three-quarters of exotic reptiles have been sold as pets that die within a year – people don’t know how to take care of them.

An RSPCA spokesperson told MailOnline, “Although their numbers are small compared to more common pets, we have real concerns about the welfare of reptiles and other exotic animals in this country.”

‘Reptiles and other exotic pets are completely dependent on their owners to meet their welfare needs, which require the right levels of heat, light and humidity, as well as a proper diet.’

‘Some species may be very large, live long or require a license or paperwork to be legally kept or sold. Many of the animals we call to help are found wandering outside, where they can quickly suffer in the cold. ‘

‘It is essential that people research the food, equipment, environment and what is required before veterinarian care in the care of their pets. If they are struggling to meet their needs then we will also urge them to ask for help. ‘

‘We believe that people can give them a little idea of ​​how difficult it can be to keep them and that animals are sometimes neglected when the novelty goes haywire and commitment comes into the house.’

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Nature Communications.

How deadly can a pet dragon be? Popular snakes that have turned their owners into murders worldwide

Burmese pythons can grow up to 23 feet

Burmese pythons can grow up to 23 feet

Pythons are found in sub-Saharan African countries and parts of Asia.

They are non-venomous snakes and kill by constriction, licking with their teeth and gathering around their prey.

Burmese pythons can grow up to 23 feet with other species, such as the ball python grows to about 6 feet.

Due to their salty nests, pythons are one of the most popular snake breeds kept as pets. However, attacks on their handlers are not uncommon.

A dragon was never discovered to have killed a person in Britain until Dan Brandon’s death was confirmed, but previous fatalities have been reported worldwide.

A dragon in Indonesia was killed early in the year, while in 2013 two boys died in Canada after running away from a pet shop.

Four-year-old Noah Barthe and his brother Conor, six, were sleeping in Jean-Claude Savoie’s flat above a shop called Reptile Ocean in August 2013.

The African rock python passed out through a ventilation duct in Campbellton, New Brunswick and dropped into the living room where the two boys were sleeping.

This strangled him to death and prosecuted him in court, where the owner was relieved of responsibility.

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