OSU scientists navigate noise with the first launch of the satellite



Scientists at Ohio State University sent their first satellite into space on Monday. It's called CubeRRT after Q-Bert, one of the most popular video games of the 1980s. (Courtesy: NASA)

COLUMBUS, Ohio –

Scientists at Ohio State University sent their first satellite into space Monday. It's called CubeRRT after Q-Bert, one of the most popular video games of the 1980s.

Onboard technology is designed to solve a major problem for researchers by breaking up noisy radio transmissions that can interfere with the efforts for detect from space what is happening on Earth.

Joel Johnson and Chris Ball were at the launch that took off from the Wallops Island research station in Virginia at around 4:30 a.m.

The satellite went into orbit from NASA's Antares rocket. 19659004] Johnson said that the "sitting bucket" is about the size of a shoebox.

"But within this small package there is a great science that will emerge from that, that kind of instruments are used to measure things about the earth's environment, including the temperatures in the atmosphere, the surface temperature of the land, ice cover in the Arctic, a lot of different scientific applications and our processor will help those instruments work better in the future. "

Mark Andrews, an badociate researcher at OSU, said that a radiometer is like a camera. "This is like a strobe light that goes off while you're trying to make measurements – cell phones, satellite communication, television, almost anything you can think of doing wirelessly."

"Right now our vision is It's clouded by what's going on out there, and this helps clarify everything, "said Andrews

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