Oregon reports 8 more COVID-19 deaths, 304 new cases, 24 in central Oregon


Weekly Report: Low positive test results, slight increase in deaths

Portland, Ore. (KTVZ) – COVID-19 claims to have killed eight more in Oregon, the state’s death toll has risen to 311, with 304 new cases, 24 of them in Central Oregon, by the Oregon Health Authority. Reported on Wednesday.

The Oregon Health Authority reported 304 new confirmed and prescribed cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, with the state receiving a total of 17,721 cases, with 376,434 negative test results.

The new confirmed cases are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (1), Crook (3), Dissutes (16), Douglas (2), Hood River (7), Jackson (13), Jefferson (5), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (13), Lincoln (2), Lynn (1), Malhour (20), Marion (20), Morrow (5), Mulnoma (82), Polk (4), Umatilla (4), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Vasco (3), Washington (51) and Yamhill (13).

Crook County has 39 COVID-19 cases, one fatality and 1,623 negative test results. Deschutes County has received 494 cases, five deaths and 16,582 negative test results. Jefferson County has received 281 cases, three deaths and 2,950 negative test results.

St. Charles Health System reported eight COVID-19 patients as of 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, two of whom were in the ICU and on ventilators.

Oregon’s 304th COVID-19 died in Multanomah County, a 72-year-old man who tested positive on July 10 and died in his residence on July 23. He had underlying conditions.

The 305th COVID-19 from Oregon is a 90-year-old woman from Multanomah County who tested positive on July 23 and died at her residence on July 27. He had inherent conditions.

Oregon’s 306th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 22 and died at her residence on July 28. He had inherent conditions.

Oregon’s 307th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 27 at her residence. He had inherent conditions.

Oregon’s 308th COVID-19 died in Morrow County, an 85-year-old woman who tested positive on July 10 and died on July 21. The condition of death and the presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 309th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on June 29 and died on July 25 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

310th COVID-19 of Oregon is a 79-year-old woman in Multanomah County who tested positive on July 27 and died on July 28 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had inherent conditions.

The 311st COVID-19 death of Oregon is a 73-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on June 21 and died on July 19. The death is being confirmed. He had inherent conditions.


Extended county-level data dashboard released

OHA today published a new, expanded version of Oregon’s “COVID-19 Testing and Outcome by County” dashboard.

The dashboard now includes additional information on weekly trends in the percentage of COVID-19 trials that have been positive by county and weekly trends in the total number of individuals tested for COVID-19 by county.

These trends help us understand the shift in COVID-19 burden in communities across Oregon.


Weekly report shows daily growth and low positivity for COVID-19

Today, OHA released its weekly report, which showed that during the week of July 20–26, 42,452 people were tested for COVID-19 in Oregon, and 5.1 percent of them had positive results, which It was down 6.6 percent last week.

During that week, OHA reported 2,241 new cases of COVID-19 infection, an increase from the previous week. In addition, 27 Oregonians were reported to have died, a slight increase from the previous week.

Large outbreaks have contributed to a decreasing proportion of recent cases, and increased sporadic cases (which are not associated with any other cases), consistent with community prevalence.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon Response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads to the American response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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