Home / Science / New species of extinct marsupial lion Identify: Wakaleo Schouteni

New species of extinct marsupial lion Identify: Wakaleo Schouteni



The carnivorous marsupial lion that was known to be extinct was identified by Australian researchers who roamed the rainforests of northern Australia about 19 million years ago.

  New species of extinct marsupial lion Identify: Wakaleo Schouteni
Image source: nationalgeographic.com.au

These new species have been named Wakaleo schouteni after the name of the paleoartist of life wild Peter Schouten. This carnivorous marsupial is the size of a dog that has big teeth like blades to break its prey and weighs 23 kilograms. They are approximately one fifth of the weight of the last marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, which became extinct 30,000 years ago and weighs about 1

30 kilograms.

After the fossilized remains of a marsupial lion the size of a kitten in Queensland, the famous fossil site, this discovery of the new species comes. The latest discovery says that this carnivorous marsupial has many skulls and dental features of the Wakaleo genus and some similarities, such as three upper premolars and four molars, with P. pitikantensis .

A paleontologist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, Dr. Anna Gillespie says: "The identification of these new species has brought to light a level of diversity of marsupial lions that was quite unexpected and suggest even more profound origins for the family, "about the relationships of the marsupial lions.

She said that the mammal at Riverleigh sites has indicated that the environment was wooded in the late Oligocene, but as a movement to the early Miocene, Australia's climate became hotter and more humid, and it seems that the forest is more closed. They could easily climb the trees as they were not heavy animals.

A well-respected illustrator, Schouten has enthusiastically told Guardian Australia that it is a great honor to be recognized by my colleagues by having a species that bears his name and that he would. They have been happy with a humble nematode, but a marsupial lion.


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