New analysis shows that Beteluse is shrinking and has entered the helium-burning phase


Is Betelgeuse preparing for EXPLODE? New analysis suggests that the super-giant star is fading away and has entered the helium-burning phase – the first phase of going to supernova – but none of us will live to see it

  • Betelgeuse is a fetching star in Orion’s planetarium that is getting wet
  • A new study has found that this initial core is undergoing helium-burning phase
  • This happens when helium fuses into carbon and eventually explodes into stars
  • Experts involved in the study say that Beteluse will explode in 100,000 years

Scientists have been keeping their eyes glued to the star beteljues since last year, with reports that the red supergiant was receding – but a new study has found that it is still more than 100,000 years until the event occurs.

An international team of scientists has suggested that the star is in the initial core helium-burning phase, when a star burns helium in carbon, one of the final stages before a supernova.

Researchers involved in the analysis also found that the small brightness diversity of Bethelues is driven by stellar vibrations, with the star’s location closer to Earth than previously thought.

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An international team of scientists has suggested that the star is in the initial core helium-burning phase, when a star burns helium in carbon, one of the last stages before a supernova

An international team of scientists has suggested that the star is in the initial core helium-burning phase, when a star burns helium in carbon, one of the last stages before a supernova

The team is led by Dr of Australian National University (ANU). Meredith Joyce, who used evolutionary, hydrodynamic, and seismic modeling to analyze the brightness variation of betalgees.

This allowed researchers to uncover the star that was currently burning helium at its core.

This occurs when the core of a star reaches about 100 million degrees, causing three helium nuclei to collide and carbon nuclei to form.

The team is led by Dr of Australian National University (ANU).  Meredith Joyce, who used evolutionary, hydrodynamic, and seismic modeling to analyze the brightness variation of betalgees

The team is led by Dr. of Australian National University (ANU). Meredith Joyce, who used evolutionary, hydrodynamic, and seismic modeling to analyze the brightness variation of betalgees

Shortly after this event, the core collapses, causing an explosion that results in a nebula – fields of dust and gas in interstellar space.

Due to this in-depth investigation, the team also found that the stellar vibrations driven by the so-called Kappa-Tantra caused the star to glow continuously or fade with two times of 185 (+/- 13.5) days and about 400 days.

But the large drop in brightness in early 2020 is unprecedented, and likely due to a cloud of dust in front of Bethelues, as seen in the image.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope found that the upheaval was likely due to a traumatic outbreak that ejected hot material into space – covering the Earth’s view of the Betelagues.

The data formed a dust cloud when the superhot plasma was ejected from the star, which cooled down and became a dust cloud, which blocked light from the surface of the betelagus.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope found that the 2020 dullness was likely due to a traumatic outbreak that ejected hot material into space - covering the Earth's view of the Batelges

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope found that the 2020 dullness was likely due to a traumatic outbreak that ejected hot material into space – covering the Earth’s view of the Batelges

The size of the Bethelues has been a mystery to the scientific community, but the latest study has determined that it contains 750 times the sun’s radio.

This information also allowed researchers to determine that there are only 530 light years from Earth, 700 light years according to earlier belief.

Their results imply that Bethelues is not at all close to the explosion, and that the final explosion from Earth has a very significant effect here, even though it is still a great deal when a supernova stops.

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