NASA telescope gue to detect rogue planets that do not revolve around stars


NASA estimates that hundreds of rogue planets are hidden around the galaxy and may actually outrun hundreds of billions of stars.

These free-floating orbs roam the space without a large star and set an orbital telescope to launch in 2025, aiming to uncover their existence.

According to the researchers, the $ 4 billion Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope would be 10 times more sensitive to detecting these invisible objects than is currently possible.

To date, only a dozen rogue planets have been found, making them difficult to study because cosmic stars flow far from the stars.

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Unlike Earth, evil planets do not revolve around a star. The $ 4b Roman Space Telescope will be 10 times more sensitive to detecting these elusive objects than is now possible

Last year, researchers in the Netherlands estimated that there could be 50 billion in the Milky Way.

According to a new report in The Astronomical Journal, however, they may eventually overtake 100 to 400 billion stars in our galaxy.

“The Universe can be mixed with rogue planets and we wouldn’t even know it,” said Scott Gowdy, an Ohio State astronomy professor.

Roman’s secret weapon in finding these nomadic planets is a technique called gravitational microlensing.

The Romans would illuminate nomadic planets with gravitational planets, which use the gravity of stars and planets to taunt light coming from the stars that pass through them.

The Romans would illuminate nomadic planets with gravitational planets, which use the gravity of stars and planets to taunt light coming from the stars that pass through them.

It uses a gravitational pull from stars and planets that taunts the light coming from the stars that pass through them.

When the light is amplified, scientists are able to see previously hidden objects, including rogue planets.

Microlensing has been used for some time but will be a ‘game changer’ for Roman astronomers.

“The microling signal from a rogue planet only lasts between a few hours and a few days and then goes on forever,” said co-author Matthew Penny, an astronomer at Louisiana State University.

“This makes them difficult to observe from Earth, even with many telescopes.”

Roman’s wide field instrument sensor, a 288-megapixel infrared near-infrared ‘camera, can scan an area 100 times larger than Hubble.

‘To really get a complete picture, our best bet is like Roman. This is a completely new frontier, ‘co-author Samson Johnson, a graduate student of astronomy at OSU, told the Ohio State News.

Johnson says that we can discover our solar system, with its nine planets orbiting the Sun, the exception being the rule.

‘The Romans will help us learn how we fit into the cosmic scheme of things by studying the evil planets. Imagine our small rocky planet floating freely in space – this mission will help us find it. ‘

Roman's wide field instrument sensor will provide 100 times larger field of view than Hubble.  In May, NASA announced that the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) was renamed after Nancy Grace Roman, one of the agency's first female employees and 'The Hubble's mother'.

Roman’s wide field instrument sensor will provide 100 times larger field of view than Hubble. In May, NASA announced that the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) was renamed after Nancy Grace Roman, one of the agency’s first female employees and ‘The Hubble’s mother’.

The Romans could also help explain to scientists how evil planets are formed.

One theory is that they form in gaseous discs around stars before being jailed by gravitational forces.

Another is that they form like stars, in the fall of heavy clouds of gas and dust.

Nancy Grace Roman joined NASA just six months after becoming the agency, and helped prepare a team of engineers and astronomers to become the Hubble Telescope.

Nancy Grace Roman joined NASA just six months after becoming the agency, and helped prepare a team of engineers and astronomers to become the Hubble Telescope.

Work on the telescope began in 2011 and in February, it was approved for hardware testing to ensure its durability in orbit.

NASA has said that it will launch sometime in 2020.

In May, the agency announced that it was renaming the telescope, then called Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), after Nancy Grace Roman, one of the agency’s first female employees.

The Romans joined NASA in 1959 and are often described as the ‘Mother of the Hubble Telescope’.

He organized teams of astronomers and engineers to become the Hubble Telescope and helped Congress approve the $ 36 million development.

Was Granny Gracie Romani?

Nancy Grace Roman was one of the first women to work at NASA and was a central figure in the development of the Hubble Telescope.

He was born on May 16, 1925 in Nashville, Tennessee.

As a child, she was drawn to the study of outer space. I was just fascinated. ‘Roman said in a short documentary by NASA.

‘I blamed my mother because she used to take me out and show me the constellation and show me the Northern Lights and things like that.’

In fifth grade she organized an astronomy club with her fellow classmates, and by the seventh grade she decided to pursue a career as an astronomer, knowing that she would face resistance in the male-dominated field.

‘Which woman will replace math in Latin?’ She remembered a high school counselor when she shared her ambitions.

Roman received a Bachelor of Science degree in astronomy from Swarthmore College and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

She had hoped to continue her career as an academic researcher, but it was not felt that she would ever qualify for a term or have access to the same resources that her male colleagues had.

“I certainly didn’t get any encouragement,” she would recall. “I was told from the beginning that women cannot be scientists.”

In 1955, he decided to work with the US Naval Research Laboratory, and in 1959, exactly six months after the agency, in the first group of workers to join NASA as head of astronomy and relativity with the Office of Space Sciences Became one. was formed.

As NASA, Roman pushed to develop an orbital telescope to measure cosmic radiation in space that would be impossible to detect on Earth due to atmospheric interference.

Nancy Roman Grace initially wanted to focus on academic research, but realizing sex would be a major obstacle to achieving a term, she went to work for the US Naval Research Laboratory and then NASA.

Nancy Roman Grace initially wanted to focus on academic research, but realizing sex would be a major obstacle to achieving a term, she went to work for the US Naval Research Laboratory and then NASA.

He contributed to the development of four orbiting astronomical observatories between 1966 and 1972, and helped champion The International Ultraviolet Explorer, a joint project between NASA and the European Space Agency that began in 1978 and was used in the first major study of stellar winds. Collected data.

Roman played a central role in persuading Congress for the $ 36 million development of the Hubble Telescope.

In 1998, Hubble’s chief scientist Ed Weiler described her as ‘the mother of the Hubble Space Telescope’.

He died on December 25, 2018 at the age of 93 – due to natural causes.

Source: NASA

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