NASA invites you to & # 39; Imagine the Earth & # 39; for Earth Day



Our magnificent planet is always ready for its foreground. On Earth Day, on April 22, NASA wants to see your opinion.

NASA invites you to celebrate the planet we call home with our #PictureEarth social networking event. Post a close-up photo on social networks of your favorite natural features, like breaking waves, ancient trees, blooming flowers or stunning sunsets. Use the hashtag #PictureEarth and upload the photo on April 22. Be sure to include the location where the photo was taken in the text of your publication on social networks.

On Earth Day, we will share some of the most impressive images of Earth from space to inspire you. We'll review Instagram, Twitter and our NASA Earth Facebook events page to find your images and select photos from around the world to show later on videos and composite images.

NASA's satellite and airborne instruments show the Earth every day to increase our knowledge of our home and improve our lives. These images, shared with scientists and audiences around the world, can use visible light, such as a photographer's camera, or look in infrared, microwave and radio wavelengths that are invisible to human eyes.

Scientists use data from all of our instruments and Earth observation spacecraft from other nations to build an image of the planet that becomes more and more complete over time. On April 26, our next addition to our Earth observation fleet, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 3, will be launched at the International Space Station. The new knowledge made possible by this fleet helps to create solutions to important global problems, such as the change in freshwater availability, food security and human health.

For more information on NASA's #PictureEarth, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth/picture-earth-for-earth-day-2019

or

https://www.nasa.gov/earth/retrata-la-tierra-para-el-d-a-de-la-tierra-2019

For more information about NASA's Earth Science programs, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth

News Media contact

Steve Cole
Headquarters of NASA, Washington
202-358-0918
[email protected]

Esprit Smith
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.
818-354-4269
[email protected]

2019-067


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