‘Microbiomes’ may impact COVID-19 severity


WEDNESDAY, January 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Bacteria in your intestine may play a role in the severity of COVID-19 infection and the strength of your immune system’s response, a new study suggests.

Not only that, imbalances in the microbiome can cause persistent inflammatory symptoms, often called “long-heel” COVIDs, the researchers said.

“Imbalance in the microbiome contributes to the severity of COVID-19, and if it persists even after viral clearance, may contribute to persistent symptoms such as prolonged COVID syndrome and multi-system inflammatory syndrome,” Chief physician Dr. Said SYE NG, a professor. Digestive Diseases Institute at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

“Restoration of missing beneficial bacteria can enhance our immunity against the SARS-CoV2 virus and early recovery from disease,” she said. “COVID-19 should be managed not only to clear the virus, but also to restore the gut’s microbiota.”

However, the study cannot prove that an imbalance in the microbiome makes COVID-19 more serious, only that there appears to be a connection between stomach viruses and bacteria, Ng said.

But there is increasing evidence that intestinal bacteria are associated with inflammatory diseases, she noted.

For the study, researchers studied blood and fecal samples from 100 patients with COVID-19 and 78 people without infection who were part of a microbiome study before the epidemic began.

They found that 274 fecal samples differed significantly between patients with and without the gut microbiome COVID-19, even though they were given drugs including antibiotics.

For example, bacteria with COVID-19 contained fewer types of bacteria that can affect the immune system response without infection. Low numbers of these bacteria were associated with severity of infection.

In addition, the number of these bacteria remained as low as 30 days after the virus was cleared by infected patients, researchers found.

COVID-19 triggers the immune system to produce inflammatory cytokines, and in some cases, this response may be excessive, leading to extensive tissue damage, septic shock, and organ failure.

Analysis of blood samples found that microbial imbalance in COVID-19 patients was associated with high levels of inflammatory cytokines and blood markers of tissue damage, such as C-reactive protein.

‘Microbiomes’ may impact COVID-19 severity


WEDNESDAY, January 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Bacteria in your intestine may play a role in the severity of COVID-19 infection and the strength of your immune system’s response, a new study suggests.

Not only that, imbalances in the microbiome can cause persistent inflammatory symptoms, often called “long-heel” COVIDs, the researchers said.

“Imbalance in the microbiome contributes to the severity of COVID-19, and if it persists even after viral clearance, may contribute to persistent symptoms such as prolonged COVID syndrome and multi-system inflammatory syndrome,” Chief physician Dr. Said SYE NG, a professor. Digestive Diseases Institute at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

“Restoration of missing beneficial bacteria can enhance our immunity against the SARS-CoV2 virus and early recovery from disease,” she said. “COVID-19 should be managed not only to clear the virus, but also to restore the gut’s microbiota.”

However, the study cannot prove that an imbalance in the microbiome makes COVID-19 more serious, only that there appears to be a connection between stomach viruses and bacteria, Ng said.

But there is increasing evidence that intestinal bacteria are associated with inflammatory diseases, she noted.

For the study, researchers studied blood and fecal samples from 100 patients with COVID-19 and 78 people without infection who were part of a microbiome study before the epidemic began.

They found that 274 fecal samples differed significantly between patients with and without the gut microbiome COVID-19, even though they were given drugs including antibiotics.

For example, bacteria with COVID-19 contained fewer types of bacteria that can affect the immune system response without infection. Low numbers of these bacteria were associated with severity of infection.

In addition, the number of these bacteria remained as low as 30 days after the virus was cleared by infected patients, researchers found.

COVID-19 triggers the immune system to produce inflammatory cytokines, and in some cases, this response may be excessive, leading to extensive tissue damage, septic shock, and organ failure.

Analysis of blood samples found that microbial imbalance in COVID-19 patients was associated with high levels of inflammatory cytokines and blood markers of tissue damage, such as C-reactive protein.

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