Michigan reports suspected case of deadly mosquito-borne EEE virus


Michigan health officials suspect a resident has contracted the rare and life-threatening disease Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) after being bitten by a mosquito, he announced on Tuesday.

This is the first human case of EEE in the state this year, and the sixth in the US.

Last year, the US saw an unusual increase in the number of people bitten by infected mosquitoes. In early October 2019, at least 30 people became infected with the disease, which kills about 30 percent of those who catch it.

After identifying a potential case in Barry County, Michigan, residents of the area there are urged to stay inside – especially after dark, when mosquitoes are more active – and spray pesticides before killing some pests Pan to, before they have a chance to kill people.

Michigan health officials reported a suspected case of the mosquito-borne disease Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in a resident this week. If confirmed, it will be the state’s first case of infection that kills 33% of human victims this year, and the sixth for the nation (file)

The Chief Medical Officer of Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services stated, “This case of EEE, a resident of Michigan, shows that it is a threat to the health and safety of mixiganders and continuous action is being taken to prevent it.” ” a statement.

The state on Wednesday began ‘aerial treatment’ by using special aircraft to scour 10 counties.

In addition to the treatment plan, health officials suggested that the counties – Barry, Claire, Ionia, Isabella, Jackson, Kent, Maxta, Montcalm, Nuego and Oakland – consider canceling outdoor events in the evening, especially if they Includes children. .

As of now, the suspected EEE case has not been confirmed, but officials suspect that the confirmed labs will return by the end of the week. No further information was given about them.

EEE most commonly begins with fever, body aches and chills that come on suddenly.

Already, 22 horses have been infected in Michigan this year - a worrying fact that there may be more cases in humans (Fig: Mosquito herds of horses in Louisiana, another state where EEE-infected insects and animals are occasionally found Go; file;

Already, 22 horses have been infected in Michigan this year – a worrying fact that there may be more cases in humans (Fig: Mosquito herds of horses in Louisiana, another state where EEE-infected insects and animals are occasionally found Go; file;

This can cause intense headaches and disorientation, as well as seizures and eventually paralysis.

The EEE virus (EEEV) is primarily run by mosquitoes, which can pass it on to birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals – most notably, horses.

Already in Michigan this year, 22 cases have been confirmed in horses, animals, for which viruses make up nearly 90 percent of the disease.

EEEV can travel through the bloodstream to the membranes around the spinal cord and brain by a mosquito bite.

Once the brain is infected, the virus can trigger dangerous inflammation that proves fatal for 33 percent of symptomatic people.

In most years, there are only five to 10 cases, occurring between spring and early fall, when the warm weather provides favorable conditions for mosquito breeding and of course feed.

Insects and viruses thrive in equally humid, marshy areas, especially those with less water.

Cases are most common in the East Coast, Great Lakes region, and Gulf Coast states.

Over the past decade, Massachusetts – which has had three cases this year – Florida, Georgia, New York and North Carolina. Wisconsin also has two reported cases in 2020.

    .