Michigan Reports 1,484 New Coronavirus Cases, 3 New Deaths Between Sunday and Monday, Feb.21-22


Michigan reported 1,484 new coronavirus cases and three new deaths between Sunday and Monday, February 21-22.

That means the average daily increase in cases in the last two days was 742.

The state averages 845 new COVID-19 cases per day and 29 new deaths per day over the past week.

Since the start of the pandemic, Michigan has reported 581,403 confirmed cases and 15,362 deaths related to COVID-19. Additionally, the state has reported 56,525 probable cases and 981 probable deaths, in which a physician and / or antigen test ruled it was COVID-19 but a confirmatory PCR test was not performed.

(The chart above shows Michigan’s 7-day moving average of new confirmed coronavirus cases. You can hover over a bar to see the number. You can also click the option just below the title to see the actual number of new reported cases per day.)

Sixty-six of the 83 Michigan counties reported new cases in the past two days. Wayne County led in new cases with 270, with Oakland and Macomb next closest with 137 and 135, respectively.

Other counties reporting more information were Kent with 101 additional cases, Washtenaw with 85, Ingham with 49, Genesee with 44, Saginaw and Ottawa with 37, and Berrien with 32.

Five counties each reported a new death, including Washtenaw, Berrien, Bay, Barry and Sanilac. Jackson and Eaton counties eliminated one death each previously reported.

(The chart above shows the 7-day moving average of Michigan deaths involving confirmed coronavirus cases. You can hover over a bar to see the number. You can also click the option just below the title to see the actual number. of new deaths reported per day.)

Hospitals across the state were treating 827 patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases on Monday, including 225 patients in the ICU. That’s less than on February 15, when hospitals treated 843 patients, but more than 217 in the ICU during that same time frame.

Of the 43,974 diagnostic tests processed in the last two days, 4.15% tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The average positivity rate in the last seven days is 3.58%.

As of Monday, Michigan had administered more than 1.97 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. That includes about 1.28 million first doses and 670,899 second doses. The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines recommend two doses given weeks apart.

Case report

First there is a chart showing the new cases reported to the state each day for the past 30 days. This is based on when a confirmed test for coronavirus is reported to the state, meaning that the patient first became ill days before.

You can access a table for any county, and you can hover over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

(In some cases, a county reported a negative (decrease) number of new cases daily, following a retroactive reclassification by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. In those cases, we subtract the cases from the old date and put 0 on the date informed.)

The chart below shows new cases during the past 30 days based on the onset of symptoms. In this chart, the figures for the most recent days are incomplete due to the lag time between people getting sick and obtaining a confirmed coronavirus test result, which can take up to a week or more.

You can access a table for any county, and you can hover over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

For more statewide data, visit MLive’s coronavirus data page, here.

To find a testing site near you, check the state’s online testing finder, here, email [email protected], or call 888-535-6136 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. week days.

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