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Mexico puts under review the relations with the United States while Trump shakes new tensions

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico said on Monday it will review all forms of cooperation with the United States, including efforts to fight the powerful drug cartels, in a sign of growing frustration over the president's antagonistic attitude Donald Trump to the country.

PHOTO OF ARCHIVE – US President Donald Trump shakes hands with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto during their bilateral meeting at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany on July 7, 2017. REUTERS / Carlos Barria / Photo File

President Enrique Pena Nieto gave the order to his cabinet in a meeting on Sunday after a week of intense bilateral tensions, during which he rebuked Trump for repeatedly fanning the conflict and irritation against Mexico.

Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray said the review would cover all aspects of the relationship, from border security and migration to trade and the fight against drug gangs.

Mexico has long been identified as the main transshipment point for illicit drugs entering the US market. UU

Noting that a decision had not yet been made to suspend or reduce collaboration, Videgaray said that the government had to act given the degree of public support that had been expressed in Mexico regarding Peña Nieto's tougher position.

"The key here is that they are not just words, this position must have practical consequences," said Videgaray, who in February said Mexico's relationship with the United States was closer than it had been with previous governments.

The review will last "a few weeks" and will take place under the auspices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Videgaray said. After that, Peña Nieto would make decisions based on the "notoriously very public differences we have today with the United States," he said.

The White House submitted a request for comments on the announcement to the State Department. There was no immediate response from the State Department.

The Mexican government's decision was backed by opposition lawmakers, who said they claimed the Senate's request last week for the government to end cooperation on migration and security with the United States in response to the implementation of the National Guard in the border between Mexico and the United States. .

"Donald Trump must understand that he must stop threatening, blackmailing and lying in the relationship if he wants Mexico to continue cooperating in things that matter to him," said Laura Rojas, director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and member of the opposition. National Action Party.

After Trump established his plans for the National Guard, Peña Nieto rebuked him in unusually direct terms, telling him not to take away his domestic policy of "frustration" in Mexico.

The border plan took shape after Trump accused Mexico of doing "nothing" to prevent illegal immigrants from reaching the United States when a "caravan" of Central Americans organized by a human rights group was heard. moved north.

Trump again threatened to scrap the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the caravan quickly began to disperse when the Mexican authorities moved in to register the migrants.

Trump, who launched his election campaign in 2015 by calling the Mexicans who come to the United States rapists, has caused deep wrath in Mexico with his repeated barrage of trade and migration, as well as his plans for a southern border wall .

The last dispute over Trump occurs when Mexico, the United States and Canada are in a crucial phase of the talks to return to work on NAFTA. The Mexican government has said for a long time that the renegotiation should be drafted within a review of the entire relationship.

Many Mexicans would like to see the government take a tougher line with the president of the United States. UU The Mexican public is much more united in its antipathy towards Trump than in supporting its own political leaders.

The upcoming presidential elections in Mexico will take place on July 1, and the main candidates have criticized Trump for his excavations against the country. The candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ranks third in most polls.

Peña Nieto, who can not stand for re-election, has one of the lowest approval ratings of any modern Mexican president, but he tends to benefit by taking a firm stand against Trump.

Despite the heated public rhetoric, some senior Mexican officials privately say that Trump's Twitter attacks in the last week were more intent on igniting their voter base and attacking their national opponents than harming Mexico.

Videgaray said the NAFTA talks would continue later this week at the Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru, which is expected to attend government officials responsible for the renegotiation.

Dave Graham report; Edited by Frank Jack Daniel and Tom Brown

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