Meteor hit the moon at 61,000 kilometers per hour during the total January eclipse



Scientists discover that the meteor that surprised the world when it struck the moon during the January total eclipse traveled at 38,000 mph.

  • The space rock hit the moon with enough power to make a 50-foot crater
  • What is the equivalent of two double-decker buses placed side by side?
  • It caused a flash that lasted 0.28 seconds, even captured by amateur cameras.
  • The ejected debris may have reached a maximum temperature of 5400 degrees Celsius, approximately the same as the surface of the Sun.

By Yuan Ren For Mailonline

Published: 13:55 EDT, April 30, 2019 | Updated: 13:57 EDT, April 30, 2019

The world was observing a lunar eclipse on January 21 when a meteor hit the moon at 38,000 mph (61,000 kph).

This astronomical projectile caught the attention of stargazers and now scientists have calculated their exact speed on impact.

The researchers calculated that the incoming rock had a mbad of 100 pounds (45 kg), measured 1-2 feet (30 to 60 cm) wide and probably left a crater up to 49 feet (15 meters) in diameter.

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The meteorite that struck the moon on January 21, 2019 during the lunar eclipse traveled at 38,000 mph (61,000 kph), scientists have revealed. Sky watchers who saw the eclipse could also see an asteroid impact (the point is shown with the arrow)

The meteorite that struck the moon on January 21, 2019 during the lunar eclipse traveled at 38,000 mph (61,000 kph), scientists have revealed. Sky watchers who saw the eclipse could also see an asteroid impact (the point is shown with the arrow)

Professor José María Madiedo of the University of Huelva, and Dr. José Ortiz, of the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia, made the final calculations.

The two academics operate the Moon Impact Detection and Analysis System (MIDAS), which uses eight telescopes in southern Spain.

MIDAS video images recorded the moment of impact.

Professor Madiedo said: "Something inside of me told me that this time would be the time," said Madiedo, who was impressed when he observed the event, as it was brighter than most events regularly detected by the survey.

At the time of the event, Professor Madiedo. tweeted Images of the incredible phenomenon shortly after the eclipse.

The impact occurred during the whole, when the face of the moon shone with a blood red spooky.

While it was finished in the blink of an eye, the telescopes of the MIDAS survey watched all the time and documented the fleeting event.

Professor Madiedo saw him at 5:41 am local time in Spain.

The call & # 39; wolf moon super blood & # 39; It was the first full moon of 2019, and it brought the last total lunar eclipse that we will see until May 26, 2021.

Researchers have calculated that the incoming rock had a mbad of 99 lb (45 kg), was between 1 and 2 feet (30 to 60 cm) wide, and probably left a crater up to 49 feet (15 meters) wide. The impact was captured by Jamie Cooper, 49, of Northamptonshire while photographing the eclipse.

Researchers have calculated that the incoming rock had a mbad of 99 lb (45 kg), was between 1 and 2 feet (30 to 60 cm) wide, and probably left a crater up to 49 feet (15 meters) wide. The impact was captured by Jamie Cooper, 49, of Northamptonshire while photographing the eclipse.

A meteoroid was as strong as between 0.9 and 1.8 tons of dynamite, a scientist said earlier.

The ejected debris may have reached a maximum temperature of 5400 degrees Celsius, approximately the same as the surface of the sun.

The space rock had previously been estimated by researchers from Colombia. and the Dominican Republic that published its findings in Icarus magazine and published on the prepress server of Cornell University.

They estimated impact speeds of around 30,890 mph (50,000 kph), but the latest report from Spanish academics has declared a higher figure of 37, 903,643 mph (61,000 kph).

The full moon of January was known as the werewolf.

It was not just a stroke of luck that led researchers to document the impact of the meteoroid.

The academics who operate the Moon Impact Detection and Analysis System (MIDAS), which uses eight telescopes in southern Spain to monitor the lunar surface, made the latest calculations.

The academics who operate the Moon Impact Detection and Analysis System (MIDAS), which uses eight telescopes in southern Spain to monitor the lunar surface, made the latest calculations.

The MIDAS survey was designed to identify these flashes on the dark side of the moon, or in the region that is not illuminated by the sun at any given time.

The surface of the moon regularly suffers impacts from small space rocks like this one; The surface acquires an average of 140 craters per year.

However, the Earth has a relatively thick atmosphere and most of the smaller rocks burn when they try to move towards it.

The impact occurred around 11:41 p.m. ET and was captured in live broadcasts around the world.

The study was published in the Monthly Notices magazine of the Royal Astronomical Society.

WHAT IS A LUNAR ECLIPSE?

An eclipse occurs every time a planet or moon pbades between another planet, the moon or the sun.

Depending on their orbits, they can be total or partial.

A lunar eclipse is a specific event that occurs when the Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.

When this happens, the Earth blocks sunlight from the moon. The shadow of the earth falls on the moon.

During a lunar eclipse, we can see the shadow of the Earth on the moon.

They can last several hours, but it is rare that a period of total eclipse lasts more than 100 minutes.

At least two lunar eclipses occur each year.

The moon will also be a little closer to Earth, which will make it appear brighter than usual, nicknamed a Super Moon. These unique factors, when combined, result in a & # 39; Super Blood Wolf Moon & # 39; This graphic shows how a lunar eclipse occurs.

The moon will also be a little closer to Earth, which will make it appear brighter than usual, nicknamed a Super Moon. These unique factors, when combined, result in a & # 39; Super Blood Wolf Moon & # 39; This graphic shows how a lunar eclipse occurs.

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