Mars: water vapors rising from the red planet suggest it “ may have been habitable ”


Was Mars once the home of ALIENS? Water vapors rising from the red planet suggest it ‘may have been habitable’, study reveals

  • Scientists have detected that water vapor rises through the atmosphere of Mars
  • Findings could offer insight into the water cycle on Mars
  • They also indicate that the Red Planet could have been the home of aliens in the past.

With the United Arab Emirates and China successfully reaching the orbit of Mars, the Red Planet has already dominated the headlines this week.

Now, a new study has brought Mars into the spotlight once again, with the discovery of water vapors rising from the planet.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), operated by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Russia’s Roscosmos, made the discovery by measuring light as vapor passes through the atmosphere.

The findings offer insight into the Martian water cycle and could provide scientists with new clues as to whether Mars was once home to life.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), operated by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Russia's Roscosmos, made the discovery by measuring light as vapor passes through the atmosphere.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), operated by the European Space Agency (ESA) and Russia’s Roscosmos, made the discovery by measuring light as vapor passes through the atmosphere.

The scientists, including two from the Open University, used an instrument aboard the orbiter called “Nadir and Stealth for the Discovery of Mars” (NOMAD) to study water vapor and “semi-heavy” water.

As hydrogen chloride gas increases, it gives researchers an indication of the history of water on Mars.

The red planet features several ancient, dry river valleys and channels that have long pointed toward the possibility of liquid water flowing once there.

A new study has put Mars back in the spotlight, with the discovery of water vapors rising from the planet.

A new study has brought Mars into the limelight once again, with the discovery of water vapors rising from the planet.

As hydrogen chloride gas increases, it gives researchers an indication of the history of water on Mars.

As hydrogen chloride gas increases, it gives researchers an indication of the history of water on Mars.

Much of it is now locked in the polar caps and buried underground.

Dr. Manish Patel, NOMAD co-principal investigator, said: “The NOMAD instrument is fundamentally changing our understanding of the evolution of water on Mars.

‘This fantastic instrument gives us a never-before-seen view of water isotopes (variants of water with different molecular masses) in the atmosphere of Mars as a function of both time and location on Mars.

“Measuring the isotopes of water is a crucial element in understanding how Mars, as a planet, has lost its water over time and, therefore, how the habitability of Mars has changed throughout its history.”

In addition to helping scientists understand how the Martian water cycle works, the findings also provide signs of magmatic activity.

Sue Horne, head of space exploration at the UK Space Agency, said: “This research is a key component in our quest to unearth the mysteries of the Red Planet.

‘Understanding water vapor on Mars would help answer the most important question: was there life on Mars?

UK scientists and technology are playing a leading role in NASA’s Perseverance rover mission to land on Mars this month.

“The mission will collect samples from the planet’s surface to improve our understanding of our neighboring world.”

A couple of studies were published in the journal Science Advances.

NASA MARS 2020: THE MISSION WILL SEE THE PERSEVERANCE ROVER AND INGENUITY SEARH HELICOPTER FOR LIFE

NASA’s Mars 2020 mission will search for signs of ancient life on the Red Planet in an attempt to help scientists better understand how life on Earth evolved.

Named Perseverance, the car-sized main rover will explore an ancient river delta within Jezero Crater, once filled with a 1,600-foot-deep lake.

The region is believed to have harbored microbial life around 3.5 to 3.9 billion years ago and the rover will examine soil samples for evidence of life.

NASA's Mars 2020 rover (artist's impression) will search for signs of ancient life on Mars in an attempt to help scientists better understand how life evolved on our own planet

NASA’s Mars 2020 rover (artist’s impression) will search for signs of ancient life on Mars in an attempt to help scientists better understand how life evolved on our own planet

The $ 2.5bn (£ 1.95bn) Mars 2020 spacecraft launched on July 30 with the rover and helicopter inside, and will land on February 18, 2021.

Perseverance is designed to land inside the crater and collect samples that will eventually be returned to Earth for further analysis.

A second mission will fly to the planet and return the samples, perhaps in the late 2020s in partnership with the European Space Agency.

This concept art shows the Mars 2020 rover landing on the red planet via NASA's 'sky-crane' system

This concept art shows the Mars 2020 rover landing on the red planet via NASA’s ‘sky-crane’ system

.

Source link