Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Where is the resentment over anti-fuss in sports and Hollywood?


The Hollywood Reporter calls out hate hatreds against Jews by columnists Ice Cube, DeSean Jackson, and others, and describes how the silent response “destroys racism” and contributes to an overall “apatholipse”.

The recent incidents of anti-Semitic tweets and posts from sports and entertainment celebrities are a very troubling omen for the future of the Black Lives Matter movement, but also the lack of widespread outrage. Given the new vocal-fullness in Hollywood and the sporting world, we expected the public to be more emotional. What we got was from the cloud-raga.

When reading the dark squishy pamphlets of popular culture, the meh-rage in a state of perpetual partiality is an undeniable sign of the coming Apatholypse: indifference to all forms of social justice. After all, if it is okay to discriminate one group of people by removing cultural stereotypes without too much pushback, then it would be fine to do the same to others. Ilogical forgets ellogic.

The tweets of the June 10 series of Ice Cube’s day, which included some creepy symbols and images, generally implied that Jews were responsible for the persecution of blacks. NFL player Dacian Jackson tweeted a number of anti-Semitic messages, stating that he was wrongly thought not to be Hitler’s (why not-not-we-all-you-can-go-to quote is your go-to guy) Stated that Jews had a plan to “expand America” ​​and achieve “world domination”. Isn’t Spectre’s work in James Bond movies?

These statements would make anyone laugh out of middle-school understanding, but then former NBA player Stephen Jackson, a self-proclaimed activist, agreed on social media with Dassian Jackson in his previous advocacy Has also achieved progress. Then he talked about the Rothschilds’ support of all banks and the infamous homophobe and Semitic Luis Farrakhan. This is the kind of inhuman character who abuses the police, killing his friend George Floyd.

June continued to sabotage everyone with anti-Semitism when artist Chelsea Handler, who was Jewish herself, posted videos of Farrakhan to her 3.9 million followers. This means that about 4 million people received a subliminal message that some Jews also thought it appropriate to be anti-Jewish.

In the same month, President Donald Trump’s reunion campaign has also been criticized for its exploitation of anti-Jewish prejudices, even though Trump’s son-in-law and campaign honored Jared Kushner and his daughter Ivanka converted to Judaism before marrying Have become. Playing on the same Rothschild trope, he issued a letter accusing the three Arab people of the Jewish world of using their fortunes as “November elections.” This is the “very fine people on both sides” Trump has worked with throughout his political career – to incite racist groups to attack racists who feel they have the presidency. For what they don’t like.

These famous, outspoken people share the same sacrificial logic as all oppressive groups, from the Nazis to the KRK: all our troubles are due to bad-apple groups who worship the wrong, color the wrong, from the wrong country Come, have the wrong gender or love the wrong gender. It is very disappointing to see people from such groups who are violently marginalized, without even realizing that it is racism to end such a bad argument.

Yes, some of the above have apologized – DeSean Jackson, Stephen Jackson, Chelsea Handler – while others continue to be rudely rude in their own prejudice. His arrogant and irrational reaction to accusations of anti-Jewish sentiment actually confirmed people’s worst opinions, rather than disappointing us. Ice Cube’s response was remorseful: “What if I was just pro-black?” This is true brother. I did not lie to anyone. I did not say that I was against anyone. Do not do with HYPE. I am telling my truth. “His” truth “was clearly anti-Semitic, but like Trump, he believes his truth exists from outside facts. As author Roxanne Gay put it succinctly: “When you post an anti-Semitic fantasy, it’s impossible to take you seriously in relation to social justice or anything. What the fuck are you doing?”

Even apologies had gone bad, more effort than real controversy. In an CNN interview, Stephen Jackson was angry and combative when he was called: “I said I could change my words.” There is nothing that I said that I support anyone. There is nothing I said that I hate anyone. I apologize for my words and I could switch. That is the end of it. I love everyone. “While it is possible that the words were incorrect, celebrities have a responsibility to get the words right. This is not enough for good intentions, because it is the actual act – and the words – that have real effect. Disastrous effects in the case. In 2013, 751 hate crimes against Jews were reported, but the number nearly tripled to 2,107 by 2019. In the same year, a gunman barged into a synagogue in San Diego and three Killing one person while injuring.

One of the most powerful songs in the struggle against racism is Billy Holiday’s melancholy “Strange Fruit”, first recorded in 1939. The song found strong resistance from radio stations fearing its graphic lyrics about lynching:

Southern trees bear a strange fruit
Blood on leaves and blood on root
Swinging bodies in the south wind
Strange fruits hanging from poplar trees

Despite those who wanted to suppress the song, it went on to sell a million copies that year and became Holiday’s best-selling record. The song was written by Abel Meropol, a white, Jewish high school teacher who performed it with his wife around New York before being given a holiday.

The lesson never changes, hence why it is so difficult for some people to learn: no one is free until everyone is free. As Martin Luther King Jr. explained: “Anywhere injustice is a threat to justice everywhere. We are stuck in an inevitable network of reciprocity. “So, let’s like it. If we are going to fear injustice, then anyone can be offended by injustice.

THR columnist Karim Abdul Jabbar is an NBA Hall of Famer and writer Mycroft and Sherlock: The Empty Birdcage And other books.