John Fogarty called Trump a ‘lucky son’ and said it was ‘illusionary’ that his Vietnam war-time song was played at the presidential rally.




John Fogarty, Donald Trump posing for a photo: John Fogarty, who wrote "fortunate Son," Recently, a video about a song was used by President Trump at a campaign rally.  Getty Image / Getty Image for Capital Concert;  Via MANDEL NGAN / AFP Getty Image


© Getty Image / Getty Image for Capital Concert; Via MANDEL NGAN / AFP Getty Image
John Fogarty, who wrote “Lucky Son”, recently responded in a video about President Trump’s use of the song at a campaign rally. Getty Image / Getty Image for Capital Concert; Via MANDEL NGAN / AFP Getty Image

  • On Thursday, President Trump arrived at a campaign rally in Freeland, Michigan, playing on the 1969 song “Lucky Son” from AirDay One One.
  • Composer John Fogarty, who wrote the song, responded to Trump’s use of his song via a Facebook video on Friday.
  • “This is a song I can write now, so I find it confusing, I would say that the president has chosen to use my song for his political rallies, when in reality, it seems that he is probably lucky. Son, ”said Fogarty.
  • Other musicians – such as Neil Young, and the late Tom Petty’s family – have criticized their use of music in Trump-sponsored events.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump led a campaign rally in Freeland, Michigan, and led to the Cradle’s Clearwater Revival for the 1969 song “Lucky Son” from Air Force One.

The song alludes to the wealthy and influential families who were able to get their sons out of the Vietnam War draft.

John Fogarty, the rock musician who was a member of the Creedence Clearwater Revival and wrote “Lucky Son”, shared a video on Facebook Friday that addressed the Trump campaign’s use of the song.

“Lately, the president has been using my song ‘Lucky Son’ for his political rallies, which I confuse to say the least,” said Fogarty in the video.

In her video, Fogarty also highlights the meaning behind the song, including:

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“Some people produce silver spoons in hand / God, don’t they help themselves, no” and “It’s not me, it’s not me / I’m not the son of a millionaire.”

“I wrote the song at the height of the Vietnam War in 1969,” Fogarty said. “By the time I wrote the song, I had already drafted and worked in the military. And I have been a lifelong supporter of my friends and gals in the military, probably because of that experience.”

In his video, Fogarty continued by saying: “In those days, we still had a draft, and something I was very upset about was the fact that privileged people, in other words, rich people, Or people who had the situation could use it. To avoid drafts and not being taken into the army. I found that very upset that this could happen and that’s why I wrote ‘Lucky Son’.


John Fogarty holding a guitar: John Fogarty on July 04, 2020 in Washington, DC on PBS


© Getty Image / Getty Image for Capital Concert
John Fogarty performs for the 40th anniversary of “A Capital Fourth” on July 04, 2020 in Washington, DC. Getty Image / Getty Image for Capital Concert


He then noted the opening verses of the song: “Some people are born, flag / ooh, their red, white and blue / wave is made to wave and when the band plays ‘Hell to the Chief’ / ooh , Then they point the cannon at you. ”

In his video, Fogerity likened the introduction of the “fortunate son” to Trump’s use of Confederate soldiers in Washington, D.C., to stage a June demonstration from Lofate Square, so he stood in front of St. John’s Church Could have and keep a Bible for one. Photo opportunity.

“This is a song I can write now, so I find it confusing, I would say that the president has chosen to use my song for his political rallies, when in reality, it seems that he is probably lucky. Son, ”Fogarty said while ending the video.

Other musicians have reacted to or criticized the use of his songs in Trump campaign events

In June, the family of the late rock musician Tom Petty condemned the apparent use of his iconic song “I Watts Back Down” at Trump’s publicity rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Paytm’s family tweeted that they issued a cease-fire order for the Trump campaign.

In July, singer-songwriter Neil Young tweeted that Trump’s Independence Day celebration at Mount Rushmore was “not OK” with his music. Young’s songs “Rockin ‘in the Free World” and “Like a Hurricane” were clearly played at the presidential event.

Since his first presidential campaign, Trump has inspired many other musicians to make an issue with his songs being played at his events or issued statements asking the Trump campaign not to use his music.

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Gallery: Musicians who ban presidential candidates from using their songs (Entertainment Weekly)

Donald Trump is wearing a suit and tie: they will not back down.

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