Japan Satellite will present & # 39; shows & # 39; of artificial shooting stars from 2020



A Japanese company plans to organize the first artificial meteor shower after a rocket carrying its technology was launched into space.

Astro Live Experiences, a startup based in Tokyo that describes itself as a "space entertainment company," has developed a microsatellite that can create "shooting stars on demand."

The satellite was transported by an Epsilon-4 rocket launched into space yesterday (Friday) in the morning from the Uchinoura Space Center in southern Kagoshima prefecture by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

After orbiting the Earth during the next year and descending to an altitude of 248 miles, the satellite, which weighs 68 kg and measures only 23 inches by 31 inches, will launch its technology next year.

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A Japanese company plans to organize the first artificial meteor shower in the world.

IAN GRIFFIN / OTAGO MUSEUM

A Japanese company plans to organize the first artificial meteor shower in the world.

The first artificial meteor shower is scheduled to illuminate the skies over the city of Hiroshima in the spring of 2020.

Perfected for seven years of laboratory work, the satellite contains 400 small bright balls made of a secret chemical formula, which can be unleashed to light the skies in up to 30 space entertainment shows.

The company plans to target "the whole world" with its celestial shows and will launch a second satellite in a private sector rocket later this year.

Other innovations that the company understands they are exploring include multi-colored shooting stars.

The spectacle of Hiroshima is expected to be visible to millions of spectators if the sky is clear, with clusters of shooting stars made by man that glow brightly for several seconds before burning.


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