In the new scene from the only eclipse, the comet appears traveling at 450,000 mph


The new eclipse shows the comet traveling 450,000 mph through the Sun’s intense radiation

  • A newly discovered comet was seen flying during a solar eclipse
  • The comet was the size of a crescent and traveled 450,000 miles per hour
  • It was 2.7 million miles from the Sun when it decomposed into radiation

A newly discovered comet was seen flying 2.7 million miles from the sun during last week’s eclipse before decomposing into dust particles from intense radiation.

Named C / 2020 X3 (SOHO), the comet was discovered by an amateur astronomer who shed through satellite data a day before the total solar eclipse that occurred on 14 December.

The comet was part of the Kreutz Sungrazer family, which originated from a large parent comet that broke into small pieces thousands of years ago.

The C / 2020 X3 appears as a small speck flying through the sky, but experts say it was traveling at about 450,000 mph in the last round of Earth’s giant star.

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A newly discovered comet was seen flying 2.7 million miles from the Sun during last week’s solar eclipse.

The comet was discovered by Thai amateur astronomer Warateth Boonplode on a NASA-funded Sungrazer project.

The organization is a citizen science project that invites anyone from the United European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to explore and discover new comets in images.

When the comet was first discovered, Boonplod speculated that it would draw streaks in the sky during a solar eclipse and that it would appear as a small spot in the photos – and that was correct.

On December 14, the comet was a small bright dot in the solar eclipse images.

The comet was part of the Kreutz Sungraser family, which originated from a large parent comet that broke into small pieces thousands of years ago.  The C / 2020 X3 appears as a small speck flying through the sky, but experts say it was traveling about 450,000 miles because it was filled with the Earth's giant star

The comet was part of the Kreutz Sungraser family, which originated from a large parent comet that broke into small pieces thousands of years ago. The C / 2020 X3 appears as a small speck flying through the sky, but experts say it was traveling about 450,000 miles because it was filled with the Earth’s giant star

Experts say it was traveling at about 450,000 mph and measured about 50 feet in diameter – the same as the length of a semicircle.

However, the comet decomposes the dust particles due to intense solar radiation a few hours before reaching the nearest point of the Sun.

The full solar eclipse, which struck South America last week, sank in darkness in Argentina and Chile for about two minutes.

Dozens of amateur and professional astronomers set up telescopes on the slopes of Villarica to observe the event – one of Chile’s most active volcanoes.

The eclipse was due to appear along a 55-mile-wide corridor – running across the Andes mountain range from the Pacific coast in Chile and into Argentina.

Full solar eclipse arrived in South America last week, sunk in darkness for about two minutes in Argentina and Chile

Full solar eclipse occurred in South America last week, thousands in Argentina and Chile sunk in darkness for about two minutes

This phenomenon was eagerly anticipated among such groups in the south of the country – the Mapuche indigenous community of Chile.

‘Today we were all looking forward to a sunny day, but nature has given us rain and at the same time it is giving us something that we need,’ Estella Nahuelpan, a leader of Matteo Nahuelpan in the southern city of Karahe, told AFP .

‘Eclipses have different meanings in Mapuche culture – they talk about’ Lan Antu ‘, such as the death of the Sun and the conflict between the Moon and the Sun.’

‘It refers to the essential balance that exists in nature,’ she explained.

In another tradition, an eclipse signifies the temporary death of the Sun during the battle of Tara and an evil force known as ‘Vekufu’.

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