In the midst of snow and controversy, protesters take to the streets for the third march of women: NPR



Protesters prepare to march at the women's rally in Washington, DC

Amr Alfiky / NPR


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Protesters prepare to march at the women's rally in Washington, DC

Amr Alfiky / NPR

For the third consecutive year, protesters march in the nation's capital and in cities across the country for the March of Women.

In Washington, DC, crowds of women in pink hats march from Freedom Plaza, advocating for women, immigrants and LGBTQ people. They are taking to the streets just a few weeks after a record number of women swore in Congress.

Crowds gathered in Washington, DC for the march of women despite reports of rain and snow.

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Crowds gathered in Washington, DC for the march of women despite reports of rain and snow.

Amr Alfiky / NPR

Marches are being held throughout the country from New York to San Francisco, to Dallas, Philadelphia and Portland, Maine. Crowds in Montpelier, Vt., They are challenging temperatures well below the freezing point. In Seneca Falls, N.Y., the headquarters of the first women's convention in the 19th century, protesters with large coats are walking through falling snow.

The protest movement, which began in 2017, still embodies many of the same ideas. But this year's message has been diluted a bit by the controversy among march leaders.

Pavlina Chladkova from North Carolina and her dog Aspen are waiting for their departure to start.

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Pavlina Chladkova from North Carolina and her dog Aspen are waiting for their departure to start.

Amr Alfiky / NPR

The ties between Tamika Mallory, one of the leaders of the march, and Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, have provoked disagreements in the high ranks of the organization due to Farrakhan's anti-Semitism. The Nation of Islam is considered a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, and the March of Women has denounced anti-Semitism.

The National Democratic Committee abandoned its sponsorship of the march, as did the National Organization of Women, Danielle Kurtzleben, of the NPR, reports from Freedom Plaza in D.C. And the controversy led some women to stay at home.

Crowds gather at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC before the women's rally begins.

Tyrone Turner / WAMU


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Tyrone Turner / WAMU

Crowds gather at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC before the women's rally begins.

Tyrone Turner / WAMU

The protesters in D.C. They met at Freedom Plaza, unlike the previous two marches, which took place on the National Mall. But the march resembles previous years, as protesters raise signs about LGBTQ, #BlackLivesMatter and immigration rights, as well as a lots of posters that refer to President Trump.

Representative Lucy McBath, recently elected in Georgia, is the only lawmaker expected to speak at the march in Washington.


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