Iconic Peter Luger Steakhouse Fills Its Empty Indoor Seats With Celebrity Mannequins


Acclaimed Brooklyn steakhouse Peter Luger believes he has found a way to make 35 percent indoor dining a little less uncomfortable. Following in the footsteps of the Inn at Little Washington, the Michelin-star steakhouse has outfitted its main dining room with celebrity mannequins as part of a witty and somewhat spooky partnership with Madame Tussauds New York.

Starting today, customers can cut one of the restaurant’s porterhouse steaks under the watchful eye of two-time Golden Globe winner Jon Hamm. Wax figures of Audrey Hepburn and Jimmy Fallon are also sitting in the restaurant, while journalist Al Roker is stationed at the entrance to direct customers to Peter Luger’s second floor. The mannequins will remain at the facility until March 1, at which time they will return to the recently reopened Madame Tussauds in Midtown Manhattan.

“We are excited to welcome diners inside with 35 percent, and we think this would be a fun and safe way to fill some of the seats that should remain empty as we continue to fight the pandemic,” says Daniel, vice president. by Peter Luger Turtel, in a statement.

Two-time Golden Globe winner Jon Hamm sips an old-fashioned cocktail at the bar
Peter luger [Official]

Two restaurant workers wearing gloves and masks next to a wax figure resembling journalist Al Roker

Journalist Al Roker greets customers at Peter Luger’s entrance
Peter luger [Official]

If this all sounds a bit familiar, it’s because Peter Luger isn’t the first restaurant to outfit its indoor dining rooms with mannequins during the pandemic. (You may be the first to wear celebrities though.) Early in the pandemic, mannequins dressed in vintage 1940s costumes appeared in the dining room of the Inn at Little Washington, the DC-area three-star Michelin restaurant. Our colleagues at Eater DC correctly reported that the move was both “theatrical” and “a bit creepy.”

The wax figures are the latest in Peter Luger’s fight to stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic, an ongoing effort that has moved the restaurant to offer home delivery and accept credit cards for the first time in 133 years, among others. changes. The restaurant is currently open for take-out, home delivery, outdoor dining, and reduced-capacity indoor dining.

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