I wish Amazon banned global seed mystery in Amazon sales



The move by Amazon appeared to be the seed of the secret that led US authorities to easily seed sales on e-commerce sites, posing potential threats to American agriculture.

According to an email seen by the Wall Street Journal, Amazon informed foreign sellers that the effective Sept 3, it would no longer allow the import of plant or seed products. The email states that some foreign sellers may have removed their offers from Amazon on the same day.

Amazon also updated its public rulebook to reflect the new policy, stating that importing seeds into the US, or the sale of seeds within the US by non-US residents, is prohibited.

On Saturday, a merchant based in East Asia, which sells sugar seeds to Amazon customers in the US, said their product was removed by Amazon.

In his email to foreign seed sellers, he explained his new policy, saying, “The action was part of our ongoing efforts to protect our customers and enhance the customer experience.”

A spokesperson for the company said in a statement on Saturday: “Going forward, we are only allowing the sale of seeds by vendors that are based in the US”. Vendors who do not follow the company’s guidelines, including possible removal action Will be subject to In his account, the spokesman said.

E-commerce company Wish will ban the sale of seeds on its platform and remove all listings, a spokesperson told The Wall Street Journal.

“Seed indexing has been taken on the basis of false claims and misleading information as the issue has been at the forefront in the last few months,” the spokesperson said. ”

San Francisco-based Wish is an online marketplace where users can order discounted goods including fashion, gadgets and kitchen items directly from merchants in China.

The policy change comes in the form of several agencies, including the US Department of Agriculture, the US Department of Homeland Securities Customs and Border Protection, the US Postal Service and the State Department of Agriculture, investigating mysterious seed shipments.

In recent months, thousands of people around the US received mail seeds they had not ordered. Most were marked from China, and shipments were often marked as jewelry, toys, or other goods. Canada and the UK are facing similar incidents among other countries.

US agricultural officials have said they are working with officials in China to decide who is sending the seed packages and to prevent future shipments. China’s Foreign Ministry said in July that the mailing labels on the seed package were fake and China had asked the US to send the package for investigation.

The USDA says it has worked with e-commerce companies for years to ensure they include information about USDA regulations on their sites and remove vendors that illegally farm with seeds Send the content. Since the mysterious mailing, the USDA says it has begun the work.

“E-commerce has presented a unique challenge to us,” said Osama El-Lisi, a deputy administrator of the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, in an interview on Wednesday. “These vendors must meet US regulatory requirements.”

Agricultural officials believe the seeds may introduce invasive species, weeds, pests or diseases that can harm American agriculture. On Wednesday, Mr. El-Lisi said the USDA received about 20,000 reports from seed recipients and collected some 9,000 packages. The USDA has so far assessed more than 2500 of those packages, he said.

Mr. El-Lisi said that the USDA has identified several seeds of poisonous weeds, called dodgers and water spinach. The agency has also found diseases caused in China, called poppiviride and spindle tuberoid virus, in the seeds, as well as the importance of some pests: an immature wasp and a larval seed beetle.

As it collects seed packages, sent to people in all 50 states, the USDA is sending them to botanists who are examining seeds to determine their species and whether there are any toxic weeds. Those on the federal list are potentially harmful. The seeds can then be sent to a Maryland laboratory for DNA testing to determine if they carry pathogens that can cause plant diseases.

Mr. El-Lisi said the findings of the dates did not raise significant concern, or required the enactment of a federal emergency-response plan. Nevertheless, he said, the USDA is very concerned about the possibility that one or more seed packages may pose a threat to American agriculture. The agency said steps could be taken to increase pest surveillance and prepare to respond quickly so that something could be detected in the agricultural sector or environment.

Officials say the exact purpose of sending the unsolicited seed packages is unclear, but a major explanation is that they are part of a “brushing scandal”. In these scams selling through online retailers such as Amazon, sellers pay “brashers” to place orders for their products, shipping packages with low prices or no content to strangers. The brashers then pose as buyers and conduct fake customer reviews to promote sales of the seller, sometimes posting reviews of other products.

Amazon on Saturday reiterated its view that seed deliveries linked to its site delayed actual orders due to Kovid-19 and brushing incidents. The company is investigating any connections that the platform package may contain or includes brushing.

In addition to being useful in brushing, seeds are also highly attractive as a real e-commerce product, according to vendors based in China and elsewhere in Asia. The high margins make the seed business attractive to foreign sellers, as a seed packet can retail for $ 10 on Amazon from Chinese suppliers, costing $ 1.50, a seller said. Shipping charges on ultralight packages are negligible.

Amazon has to take place in the stages of removing seed offers, 3 emails to foreign seed sellers. Foreign traders who ship their seeds directly to American customers will have their offers immediately removed. Those who rely on Amazon to fulfill their orders – and have inventory stored in Amazon’s warehouses – will have their offers begin September 30, according to the email.

Write John Emont at [email protected] and Jessie Newman at [email protected]

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