Huge asteroid to touch the Earth on the day of the royal wedding



An asteroid that heads towards the Earth (Photo: X Mark)

The royal wedding is almost threatened by a giant asteroid that heads towards Earth, NASA has revealed.

The day before Prince Harry and Meghan make the knot in Windsor, an asteroid is expected to approach the surface of the Earth.

The asteroid named JPL 8, must fly beyond the planet around 2.21 on Friday morning.

It is estimated that JPL 8 is approximately 49 to 110 m in diameter, or about the size of an average football field.

Goes toward Earth at a fast speed of 13.9 kilometers per second or more than 3,000 miles per hour.

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It is not the only object that threatens life on the planet as we know it, since in just over a week an asteroid is still waiting larger. fly beyond the Earth.

This as a teroid, categorized as 2018 GL1, is approximately 68 meters wide and will pass close to Saturday morning approaching approximately 14.3 Lunar Distances from Earth, or more than 3 million miles.

About 100,000 people are expected to gather at Windsor Castle on Saturday, May 19th for the wedding, but they can rest easily, because by the time Harry and Meghan exchange their vows in St George's Chapel, the asteroids will have passed. safely for our planet.

Prince Harry and Megan Markle will get married this Saturday (Photo: AFP)

Although hundreds of asteroids are relatively close to Earth each year, only a few close enough for NASA to consider it a Near Earth Object (NEO) threat

2018 GL1 is technically a NEO, but the chances of it hitting the Earth are very small.

NASA said: "Every day, the Earth is bombarded with more than 100 tons of dust and sand-sized particles."

About once a year, an asteroid the size of a car. hits the Earth's atmosphere, creates an awesome fireball and burns before reaching the surface.

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