Hubble observes the hidden depths of NGC 2903 | Astronomy



The NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope has produced an unprecedented image of the central region of the spiral galaxy NGC 2903.

This Hubble image shows the central part of the spiral galaxy NGC 2903. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / L. Ho et al.

This Hubble image shows the central part of the spiral galaxy NGC 2903. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / L. Ho et al.

Few of the residents of the Universe are as iconic as the spiral galaxy.

These celestial objects that fill the center of attention combine rotating and rotating arms with dispersions of bright stars, outbursts of glowing gas and dark lines woven of cosmic dust, creating truly amazing scenes.

The spiral galaxy NGC 2903 is approximately 30 million light-years away in the constellation Leo.

Also known as LEDA 27077, UGC 5079 and IRAS 09293 + 2143, the galaxy was discovered by German astronomer William Herschel on November 16, 1784.

NGC 2903 has an extremely high speed to create new stars in its central region.

It was studied as part of a Hubble study of central regions of approximately 145 nearby galaxies.

The aim of the study was to help astronomers better understand the relationship between the black holes that hide in the nuclei of galaxies and the bulge of stars, gas and dust in the form of a rugby ball in the center of the galaxy, as which is seen in this image of NGC 2903.

The image is a composite of separate exposures acquired by the Advanced Camera for Hubble Surveys (ACS).

Two spectral filters, F658W and F814W, were used to sample several wavelengths.

The color results from badigning different tones to each monochromatic image badociated with an individual filter.


Source link

Check Also

Maybe life on Earth is as good as it seems?

Plate tectonics is important for habitability, and it appears that optimal conditions existed for planets …