Hubble Captures Distant Supernova’s Light Echoes | Astronomy

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The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has noticed a particularly uncommon cosmic phenomenon, known as a ‘light echo,’ in Messier 82, a star-forming galaxy situated 11.four million light-years away within the course of the northern constellation Ursa Major.

SN 2014J occurred at the upper right of Messier 82 and is marked by an ‘X.’ The inset images at top reveal an expanding shell of light from the stellar explosion sweeping through interstellar space, called a ‘light echo.’ The images were taken 10 months to nearly two years after the violent event – from November 6, 2014 to October 12, 2016. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Y. Yang, Texas A&M University & Weizmann Institute of Science.

SN 2014J occurred on the higher proper of Messier 82 and is marked by an ‘X.’ The inset photos at high reveal an increasing shell of sunshine from the stellar explosion sweeping by means of interstellar house, known as a ‘light echo.’ The photos had been taken 10 months to almost two years after the violent occasion – from November 6, 2014 to October 12, 2016. Image credit score: NASA / ESA / Y. Yang, Texas A&M University & Weizmann Institute of Science.

Voices reverberating off mountains and the sound of footsteps bouncing off partitions are examples of an echo. Echoes occur when sound waves ricochet off surfaces and return to the listener.

Space has its personal model of an echo. It’s not made with sound however with mild, and happens when mild bounces off mud clouds.

Texas A. & M. University astronomer Yi Yang and colleagues used Hubble to check one in every of these cosmic echoes.

“A light echo occurs because light from a supernova travels different distances to arrive at Earth,” the astronomers defined.

“Some light comes to Earth directly from the supernova blast. Other light is delayed because it travels indirectly.”

“In this case, the light is bouncing off a huge dust cloud that extends 300 to 1,600 light-years around the supernova and is being reflected toward Earth.”

The group measured the dimensions and brightness of ‘light echoes’ from the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2014J within the close by galaxy Messier 82.

“In Messier 82 we see a bright blue disk, webs of shredded clouds, and fiery-looking plumes of glowing hydrogen blasting out of its central regions,” the scientists mentioned.

“Close encounters with its larger neighbor, the ‘grand design’ spiral galaxy Messier 81, is compressing gas in Messier 82 and stoking the birth of multiple star clusters.”

“Some of these stars live for only a short time and die in cataclysmic supernova blasts, as shown by SN 2014J.”

The group’s findings are revealed within the Astrophysical Journal and on Cornell University Library’s arXiv.org web site.

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Yi Yang et al. 2017. Interstellar-Medium Mapping in M82 by means of Light Echoes round Supernova 2014J. ApJ 834, 60; doi: 10.3847/1538-4357/834/1/60

Yi Yang et al. 2017. Late-time flattening of Type Ia Supernova mild curves: Constraints from SN 2014J in M82. AAS journals, in press; arXiv: 1704.01431

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