Global study on the causes of under-five mortality in India soon- The New Indian Express



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By Kunal Dutt
New Delhi, November 22 (PTI) A global study of the occult
The causes of the deaths of children under the age of five will soon be
carried out in India, using "minimally invasive" techniques and
Advanced laboratory methods, the head of ICMR said today.

Soumya Swaminathan, Director General of India
The Medical Research Council (ICMR) said that the study entitled
Child Health Surveillance and Mortality Prevention (CHAMPS),
funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will begin in
pilot base in a "month or two" in the country.

"The idea behind this study is to try to understand the
Causes of death of children under the age of five. In most
countries, including India, the maximum load of premature babies
Mortality occurs in children under the age of five.

"So, it's important to avoid that, in fact, that everything
the world now focuses on reducing that through various
interventions such as vaccination, water improvement,
sanitation, access to antibiotics, but unless we understand
what are the causes that are killing children, we can not
take preventive measures, "he said.

The head of the ICMR, which will soon badume the functions of deputy
Director General of Programs, World Health Organization
in Geneva, said the study has already started in "South
Africa, Mozambique and Mali. "

" Now it will be done in Bangladesh and India. We will do it
start the pilot very soon, at the Safdarjung Hospital here, in a
one or two months, because the approval of the Ethics Committee, and
everything has been done, "Swaminathan told PTI.

As part of the study, the hospital run by the Center will act as
the "Expert Guidance Center", where pediatricians
department doctors will receive training, they can do
continuous training.

"An international team of experts will come, from
the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Atlanta,
In the USA. And, the laboratory tests will be carried out in
collaboration with the CDC, "he added.

This study will use a lot of advanced laboratories
methods, to discover the "hidden causes of death," he said.

"The study will be done by minimally invasive taking
tissue biopsies, tissue samples, after the child has died,
how to take samples of veins, lungs, liver, spleen, blood and
then make a series of microbiological and pathological
investigations, "said the head of ICMR.

The National Institute of Pathology (NIP) in
Safdarjung Hospital will be the main institute involved in
the study.

"After the hospitals, we want to take it to the field areas,
where there is a lot of infant mortality, so we can
actually capture, ultimately, the cause of child deaths
in the community. Also, we want to see a lot of
pathogens and diseases, "he added.

Swaminathan said the idea originated through discussions
in global forums.

"The fact that previous autopsy studies have shown quite
amazing things Most of these autopsy studies have been
made in Africa. Autopsies are very difficult for many
reasons

"And that's when they came up with this concept of
minimally invasive biopsies, which is more acceptable for the
families, and easier to do also for doctors, "he said.

The head of ICMR said that although there is still a lot of
social reluctance, but "things are changing".

"If you look at organ donation, more and more people are
advancing Then, it's the way you approach, tell the
families the logic and the biggest cause, that the child in the
neighborhood could be next, so a wider context is
important, "he added.

According to the official CHAMPS website," Every year,
Nearly six million children under the age of five die.

Unfortunately, the causes of these deaths often remain
mystery due to gaps in surveillance of the disease, death records
and data to inform policy based on evidence, especially in
countries of resources, where mortality rates are the highest. "
PTI KND SMN
SMN
.

This is an unedited, unformatted feed from the Press Trust of India cable.

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