Fans have been severely criticized for their ‘Hello Infinity’ debut, the developers responded


  • In 2018, Microsoft unveiled the ambitious next entry in the long-running “Halo” first-person shooter game series: “Halo Infiniti.”
  • The game launched with the next-gen Xbox Series X this holiday season, and Microsoft featured “Infinite” in action for the first time last week.
  • Fans’ response was severe: the graphics were flat and unqualified for the so-called “next generation” game console.
  • The game’s developer, Microsoft-owned 343 Industries, released a statement on Thursday night, promising to address “some feedback about the detail, clarity, and overall loyalty” of the upcoming game.
  • For more stories visit the Business Insider homepage.

Microsoft’s flagship game for next-gen Xbox, “Halo Infiniti”, is facing sharp criticism from fans for how it looks.

Since July 23, when the game was shown during an hour of play for the Xbox Xbox X, fans and critics have pulled scenes from the game. They say that it doesn’t sound as good as previous games, and that it doesn’t showcase Microsoft’s powerful next-gen game console.

A comprehensive video from Digital Foundry digs into these criticisms, including the lack of “flat” graphics and visual details:

On Thursday night, the Microsoft-owned studio behind “Halo Infinity” released a lengthy statement to address concerns.

John Junjack, community manager for 343 Industries, said in a blog post that despite being a few months away from the game’s scheduled holiday launch, the studio “intends to address some feedback around detail, clarity and overall loyalty.”

“We’ve heard feedback from some sections of the community about visuals,” he said. “While some feedback was expected and already speaks to areas of progress, other aspects of feedback have brought new opportunities and ideas to the team that the team is taking very seriously and is working to assess. ”

In particular, Junyszek criticized the game’s “overall art style and visual fidelity” – two “key areas being debated” by fans. In the former case, he defended the choice of 343 to return to the roots of the “Halo” series.

“With Hello Infiniti, we are returning to a more ‘classic’ art style,” he said, “which was an important message that previously revealed very encouraging and positive responses.” Although some fans may not like it, Juniszek said that “we stand by this decision and are happy to see it resonate with many fans around the world.”

But in terms of visual criticism, he said the studio wants to address those concerns before launch.

Hello infinite

This screenshot in particular was cited by critics as representative of scenes lacking in the game.

343 Industry / Microsoft Studio


As a visual allegiance critique, Juniszek said, “We have work to address some of these areas and raise the level of fidelity and overall presentation for the final game.”

In particular, the version of the game displayed last week is not the final version of the game: it is “work in progress from several weeks in advance,” Juniszek said. This often happens when the game is shown before launch. An incomplete version of the game is captured on video and used to create marketing. As the game is finalized for launch, they often receive the final touches that must be closed until the last minute.

In the case of “Halo Infiniti”, the game is already being planned as an ongoing service. “We will continue to be flight-dependent and continue the feedback and community involvement well beyond launch, as we grow up and develop the game together,” Junacek said.

More specifically, 343 has announced at least one visual upgrade coming to “Halo Infinite” since launch: ray tracing, a lighting technique that can dramatically change the game’s visuals.

Watch the full gameplay demo for “Halo Infinite” below, and judge for yourself whether it looks “next-gen” or not:

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