Facebook is attacked by tracking Internet users who do not have a Facebook account

So you think you're very smart because you never registered for a Facebook account. And while your friends are worried about who has to use their profile data without permission, you take great pleasure in the fact that your personal information is secure and remains out of the clutches of Facebook. Or is that? During his testimony before a House committee on Wednesday, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg said his company tracks Internet users who have not subscribed to Facebook.

Responding to a question prepared by US Representative Ben Luján (D -New Mexico), Zuckerberg responded that Facebook tracks non-users for security reasons. That means that these non-subscribers have no idea what information Facebook has obtained about them. This did not sit well with lawmakers in Congress, who could draft regulations to apply against social networking applications and others of their kind. "We have to fix that," said representative Luján, referring to a process that forces users who do not use Facebook to register for the service if they want to know what personal information has been obtained. Facebook responded by saying that it has no plans to develop a method that allows non-users to see the data about them collected by the company.

In addition to politicians, privacy advocates are also disturbed by Zuckerberg's comments. Chris Calabrese, vice president of policy at the Center for Democracy and Technology, said Facebook needs to reveal what it is doing with all this information.

Some cybersecurity experts expect executives from Google, Amazon, Reddit and Twitter to be summoned to testify on Capitol Hill.

source: Reuters, Bloomberg

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