Experts say that if Venus does not alter Jupiter’s orbit then Venus could be livable today


Venus is a hellish world with clouds of sulfuric acid, but new research suggests that it was an oasis like the Earth billions of years ago – and it would still be habitable if not for Jupiter.

Jupiter, which is more than 2.5 times the mass of all other planets in the solar system, may have disrupted Venus’s orbit at the point of dramatic changes in climate – then warming up and releasing its water into the atmosphere.

Scientists at the University of California believe that Venus’s orbit may be shorter than that of a circle, but as it migrated to Jupiter, it pushed the planet even closer.

The current orbit of Venus is 0.006, but the team found that it was once 0.3 and ‘more likely that it was habitable then’.

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Venus is a hellish world with clouds of sulfuric acid, but new research suggests it was an Earth-like oasis billions of years ago - and it would be habitable even if not to Jupiter

Venus is a hellish world with clouds of sulfuric acid, but new research suggests it was an Earth-like oasis billions of years ago – and it would be habitable even if not to Jupiter

Previous models have yet to discontinue the dance of Jupiter, some project as it slowly made its way towards the Sun over the course of hundreds of millions of years, Space.com reports.

Others suggested that the giant rod of gas reach directly into the orbit of Mars, making way for its current position.

It has been agreed in the scientific community that the planet, which has a mass of 2.5 times the mass of the combined planets, was able to orbit everything on the solar system as it orbits.

The team at the University of California Riverside (UCR) began the investigation by observing their orbit of Venus, which they noted is ‘almost completely circular.’

Jupiter, which is more than 2.5 times the mass of all other planets in the solar system, may have disrupted Venus's orbit at the point of dramatic change in climate - then warming and cooling and releasing its water into the atmosphere do.

Jupiter, which is more than 2.5 times the mass of all other planets in the solar system, may have disrupted Venus’s orbit at the point of dramatic change in climate – then warming and cooling and releasing its water into the atmosphere do.

Astronomer Stephen Kane said: ‘An interesting thing about today’s Venus is that its orbit is almost spherical.’

‘With this project, I wanted to find out if the classroom has always been spherical and if not, what are its implications?’

For their investigation, the team designed a model that simulated the solar system.

It calculated the location of all the planets at any given time and how they pull each other in different directions.

Scientists measure how much the value of a planet’s orbit is less than 0, which is completely spherical, and 1, which is not spherical.

A number between 0 and 1 is called the eccentricity of the class.

An orbit with an eccentricity of 1 will not even complete an orbit around a star; It will only launch in space, Kane said.

Scientists at the University of California believe that Venus's orbit may be shorter than that of a circle, but as it migrated to Jupiter, it pushed the planet even closer.  The current orbit of Venus is 0.006, but the team found that it was once 0.3 and 'more likely that it was habitable then'.  The picture is a model of the solar system showing how planets move

Scientists at the University of California believe that Venus’s orbit may be shorter than that of a circle, but as it migrated to Jupiter, it pushed the planet even closer. The current orbit of Venus is 0.006, but the team found that it was once 0.3 and ‘more likely that it was habitable then’. The picture is a model of the solar system showing how planets move

Venus is currently at 0.006, but Kane’s model suggests that when Jupiter was close to the Sun about a billion years ago, Venus could have a crank of 0.3.

Ken said, “As Jupiter has migrated, Venus will have undergone dramatic changes in climate, warming and cooling and rapidly losing its water to the atmosphere.”

On 14 September, scientists announced that they had detected traces of phosphine gas in the clouds above Venus, which could be an indication that the planet supports microscopic life,

However, for this to happen, Kane noted the microorganisms to maintain their presence in sulfuric acid clouds above Venus for nearly a billion years, since Venus had surface liquid water – although this is not impossible.

“There are probably many other processes that can produce gas that has not yet been detected,” Kane said.

Finally, Kane says it is important to understand what happened to the planet Venus, a planet that was once habitable and now has a temperature of up to 800 degrees Fahrenheit.

Ken said, “I focus on the difference between Venus and Earth, and what went wrong for Venus, so we can gain insight into how the Earth is habitable, and we can make this planet the best it can be.” Can do for. “

Carbon Dioxid and Solid Acid Drops available at Venus’s ATMOSPHERE

Venus’ atmosphere consists mainly of carbon dioxide, which consists of clouds of sulfuric acid droplets.

The heat of the Sun is trapped in the thick atmosphere, resulting in surface temperatures exceeding 470 ° C (880 ° F).

The atmosphere consists of many layers with different temperatures.

The level at which the clouds are, about 30 miles (50 km) above the surface, is about the same temperature as the Earth’s surface.

As Venus moves slowly backwards on its axis in its solar orbit, the cloud’s top layer appears around the planet every Earth days.

They are driven by stormy winds of about 224 miles (360 km) per hour.

Atmospheric lightning bursts illuminate these accelerating clouds.

The speed within the clouds decreases with the height of the cloud, and is estimated at only a few miles (km) per hour on the surface.

On land, it would look like a very misty, overcast day on Earth and the atmosphere is so heavy that it would feel like you were within a mile (1.6 km) deep of water.

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