ER doctor talks about his adverse reaction to his second Pfizer jab


The Australian ER doctor describes the “ shocking ” adverse impacts of Pfizer’s second coronavirus hit that stunned him for days, as one expert admits there have been “ a very high number of serious reactions. ”

  • A doctor detailed his adverse reaction to the second puncture of the Pfizer Covid vaccine
  • Dr. David Caldicott obtained standard vaccines and others for overseas deployments.
  • He said that he had never experienced such an intense reaction as the one he had with this vaccine.

Dr. David Caldicott (pictured) detailed his adverse reaction to the Pfizer Covid vaccine

An experienced emergency room physician says he was stunned for days by the side effects of his second injection of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine that “ shocked him. ”

David Caldicott. who works at Calvary Hospital in Canberra, was one of the first people in the country to receive the vaccine under the government’s Phase 1a implementation.

Despite receiving his childhood vaccinations, the flu shot every year, and numerous injections as part of international deployments, the seasoned physician said the reaction to Pfizer’s vaccine was the most “vigorous” he has ever experienced.

Dr. Caldicott received his first dose of the Pfizer vaccine in February, which he described as fairly normal with no adverse effects.

“I had a little pain in my arm for a few days afterwards, which is common in many strokes,” he told ABC.

On March 19, exactly three weeks after the first puncture, she received the second dose of the vaccine and continued her workday.

Remember that that night you already began to experience the effects, with a general feeling of discomfort.

The next morning, a Saturday, he was so exhausted that he canceled his weekend plans and decided to stay home.

“Saturday was a blank day and Netflix … I had no fever, some people get that, but I felt thirsty, tired and a little nauseous,” he said.

Dr. Krispin Hajkowicz (pictured) is being vaccinated during a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine launch at STARS Metro North Health Center in Brisbane on Monday, March 1

Dr. Krispin Hajkowicz (pictured) is being vaccinated during a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine launch at STARS Metro North Health Center in Brisbane on Monday, March 1

After the weekend he managed to recover, but was surprised by such a strong reaction: he contacted his colleagues to see if anyone else had the same effects.

As an ER doctor, you don’t want to appear weak. I was very relieved to find that many of my colleagues felt the same … [some] I had to take time off from work, ” Dr. Caldicott said.

Flinders University professor of medicine Nikolai Pterovsky told ABC that the significant reaction to the second hit was actually noticed in Pfizer’s phase three trials.

“There were a very high number of serious reactions after the second dose … we don’t understand what causes them,” he said.

Vaccines generally work by injecting a weakened virus or a distinctive protein into the body that trains the immune system to recognize and fight infection without the danger of an active virus.

Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine works differently by injecting messenger RNA into muscles, signaling the body to make the signature protein.

The mRNA itself cannot replicate, so once the initial instructions are given, the muscles create the virus protein for a few days and then return to normal.

The Pfizer vaccine is made using a new type of mRNA-containing technology that tells the body to make Covid proteins for a few days, which the immune system then fights off.

The Pfizer vaccine is made using a new type of mRNA-containing technology that tells the body to make Covid proteins for a few days, which the immune system then fights off.

This process eliminates much of the lengthy manufacturing process, which is what allowed the vaccine to be developed and tested so quickly.

These types of vaccines are new compared to existing vaccines, and have only been seriously studied since 2005 after researchers discovered how to stabilize the process.

Pfizer’s vaccine packages the mRNA in a lipid envelope, which Professor Petrovsky says could be the cause of the reaction rather than the virus protein.

Reaction to the second prick has not been seen in Moderna or AstraZeneca vaccines.

Dr. Caldicott said that despite his adverse reaction to the Pfizer jab, he would not hesitate for a second to receive it again, and said he personally knows people abroad who have died from Covid.

He said that after an initial day or two of discomfort, he has recovered and has not experienced any other adverse effects.

Although he said he would recommend maybe taking a day off after the second jab.

.

Source link